Managing Diversity--The Courage to Lead

By Elsie Y. Cross | Go to book overview

in culture-change efforts, to identify norms that create barriers for some groups within the corporation, and enablers (advantages) for others, they learn to identify similar barriers and advantages in other arenas of their lives.

These initiatives give me the most hope for the future. Working with a network of consultants and trainers who share a common vision of what it means to be citizens in a democracy, and who have joined with me to try to turn that vision into reality, is rewarding beyond measure. I have no delusion that racism or sexism or heterosexism will be overcome in my lifetime, or the lifetimes of my child or grandchild. But I do continue to believe that we can ameliorate their impact in our lives and in the lives of our communities and our nation.

Within the democratic concept of citizenship, a basic tenet is that we are, indeed, all "created equal." More and more I recognize that the essence of discrimination is not difference--it is the fact that we are, in every sense that matters, the same. We all respond in the same ways to abuse, discrimination, intolerance, injustice. We are all tempted by the prerogatives of power to forget our common humanity, and to look for rationalizations of "difference" to justify our advantages. When we finally recognize that we are actually equal, really the same, we can start recognizing one another as citizens and begin creating a democracy that functions in actuality--not just in imagination.

When our leaders gain the skills and find the courage to begin to manage to this end, we will all be able to hold our heads a little higher, as fellow citizens of the world's most promising democracy.


NOTES
1
For the statistics cited in this section, see William P. O'Hare et al., "African Americans in the 1990s", Population Bulletin 46, no. 1 ( July 1991).
2
For an overview of the metrics process, with sample questions, see The Diversity Factor Article Collection: Metrics ACC5. Also see Appendix 2 in this text.
3
For a full discussion of this process, see Yvette Hyater-Adams and Delyte D. Frost , "Partnership for Change at CoreStates Financial Corp", The Diversity Factor 6, no. 4 (Summer 1998).
4
See "1998 Labor Day Fact Sheet", a press release from the Catalyst organization, citing Bureau of Labor Statistics figures. Numbers do not total 100 percent due to rounding.
6
Delyte D. Frost, "A Special Place for White Women Only", unpublished paper prepared for Elsie Y. Cross Associates Inc., Philadelphia, PA, 1973; revised 1976, 1987.
7
See Women of Color in Corporate Management: A Statistical Picture ( New York: Catalyst, 1998).

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Managing Diversity--The Courage to Lead
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Leadership for Democracy: The Managing Diversity Intervention 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - Behind the Model 13
  • 3 - Managing Diversity: The Beginning of a Theory 31
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - From Theory to Practice 47
  • Notes 71
  • 5 - The Theory Evolves 73
  • Notes 90
  • 6 - Jaraco Corporation: a Case Study In Culture Change 93
  • 7 - White Men as Champions 115
  • Notes 123
  • 8 - Putting it all Together: The Corestates Story 125
  • Notes 135
  • 9 - What We Need to Know to "Manage Diversity" 137
  • Notes 145
  • 10 - Citizens all: Toward the Future 147
  • Notes 165
  • Appendix 1 - The Discourses of Diversity: The Links Between Conversation and Organizational Change 167
  • Notes 177
  • Appendix 2 - Measuring Results 179
  • Notes 203
  • Appendix 3 - Suggestions for Further Reading 205
  • Appendix 4 - The Language of Diversity: An Introductory Guide 215
  • Notes 232
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 239
  • About the Author 251
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