White Women Writing White: H.D., Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and Whiteness

By Renée R. Curry | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments
The author and publisher gratefully acknowledge permission for use of the following material:
From Richard Dyer, White ( Routledge, 1997). Reprinted with permission.
From H. D., Collected Poems: 1912-1944, edited by Louis L. Martz (New Directions, 1983). Copyright © 1982 by The Estate of Hilda Doolittle. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp. and Carcanet Press Limited.
From H. D., Helen in Egypt (New Directions, 1961). Copyright © 1961 by Norman Holmes Pearson. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp. and Carcanet Press Limited.
From H. D., Hermetic Definition (New Directions, 1972). Copyright © 1972 by Norman Holmes Pearson. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp. and Carcanet Press Limited.
From H. D., Trilogy (New Directions, 1973). Copyright © 1944, 1945, 1946 by Oxford University Press, renewed 1973 by Norman Holmes Pearson. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp. and Carcanet Press Limited.
Excerpts from The Complete Poems 1927-1979 by Elizabeth Bishop. Copyright © 1979, 1983 by Alice Helen Methfessel. Reprinted by permission of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc.
Excerpts from The Arrival of the Bee Box," Cut," Daddy, The Swarm," and Wintering from Ariel by Sylvia Plath. Copyright © 1963 by Ted Hughes. Copyright renewed. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.
Experpt from Fever 103 from Ariel by Sylvia Plath. Copyright © 1963 by Ted Hughes. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. Fever 103 originally appeared in Poetry Magazine.
Excerpts from The Rivals and Tulips from Ariel by Sylvia Plath. Copyright © 1962 by Ted Hughes. Copyright renewed. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.
Fulbright Scholars, Perfect Light," 18 Rugby Street," and You Hated Spain from Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes. Published and reprinted by permission of Faber and Faber Ltd.
From Collected Poems by Sylvia Plath. Published and reprinted by permission of Faber and Faber Ltd.
Excerpts from Face Lift," The Other," Electra on Azalea Path," Whiteness I Remember," Conversation Among the Ruins," Winter Landscape, With Rooks," Pursuit," Tale of a Tub," and Soliloquy of the Solipsist from The Collected Poems of Sylvia Plath, edited by Ted Hughes . Copyright © 1960, 1965, 1971, 1981 by the Estate of Sylvia Plath. Editorial material copyright © 1981 by Ted Hughes. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

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White Women Writing White: H.D., Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and Whiteness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 Introduction: "A Poetics of Presumption" 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 "Minute Granules on a White Thread": H.D. and a Masterful Whiteness 21
  • Notes 74
  • Chapter 3 "A Sort of Inheritance; White": Elizabeth Bishop and Selective Self-Reflection on Whiteness 75
  • Notes 122
  • Chapter 4 "White: It is a Complexion of the Mind" 123
  • Conclusion 169
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
  • About the Author *
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