Changing Childhood Prejudice: The Caring Work of the Schools

By Miriam M. Davidson; Florence H. Davidson | Go to book overview

9
Conclusion

Tom's refrain of "What can you do?" was echoed by his classmates, almost all of whom graduated happily enough but with discouraged feelings about their own ability to contribute to society. Most still harbored some ethnic prejudice and cultivated indifference. Despite the well-intentioned efforts of their school, parents, and community, the prejudiced and premoral assumptions of these students went essentially unchallenged, let alone enlightened, throughout their educations.

Pessimism and discouragement among young people have clearly worsened during the 1980a and 1990s. There is less trust that adults have answers. The decade following a national commission's 1993 A Nation at Risk and the corresponding shelf-load of books on school reform 1 has produced little change in most schools, while ever greater numbers of working mothers and lonely single parents depend more on schools to help rear their children. They want reform to focus more on care than on competition, agreeing with Betty Sichel that

The extent to which bonds of caring, relationship and support have been loosened, even at home since divorce became commonplace, mean schools must take over. The habits of the heart of even the leading segment of society are heartless habits that concentrate on personal success, material fulfillment, and newer forms of individualism. 2

And indeed, America has lost its sense of direction, "tis all in pieces, all coherence gone," 3 if we can accept that nearly half our children are battered by divorce, poverty, or even homelessness; many affluent ones are buying drugs; poor children in cities are selling drugs, carrying guns, and being shot; the average age of juvenile murderers his under 16; one-fourth of young black men are locked up or have criminal records; and nearly 60 percent of black and Hispanic students leave school in a semi-literate state before the tenth grade. The schools did not cause the material poverty situation, but correcting moral and

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Changing Childhood Prejudice: The Caring Work of the Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - The Cognitive Roots of Prejudice 1
  • 2 - The Emotional and Social Roots of Prejudice 25
  • 3 - Prejudice Tied to Moral Judgment: A Study 49
  • 4 - Power and Favor-Trading (Stages One and Two) 77
  • 5 - Goodness, Niceness, and Higher Ideals: (Stages Three, Four, Five, and Six) 91
  • 6 - Creating Character in Early School Years 109
  • 7 - Making Choices in Middle School 129
  • 8 - Fostering Ideals in High School 149
  • 9 - Conclusion 171
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 219
  • About the Authors 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.