Democracies of Unfreedom: The United States and India

By Brij Mohan | Go to book overview

Epilogue: A Tale of Two Titans

The memory of Muli's humiliation stayed with me. I recalled similar incidents in my own country, and I wondered if the responses of untouchables to discrimination paralleled those of minorities in other countries. Was Muli indifferent to the insults he bore in silence? I hardly thought so; but I wondered how an ordinary untouchable like Muli survived economically, socially, and psychologically as a member of a despised group at the bottom of society. What were his joys, aspirations, and triumphs, as well as his humiliations? What would provoke someone like him to question the treatment he received from upper-caste people, to fight back?

James Freeman ( 1979: 5)1

"In one generation we have moved from denying a black man service at a lunch counter to elevating one to the highest military office in the nation and to being a serious candidate for presidency. This is a magnificent country . . ." said retired General Colin Powell before "leaping into the abyss of national politics [which] is a nuthouse" ( Reeves, 1995d: 6B). There are common conceptual-comparative elements in the "life histories" of Muli and Colin Powell. The difference, however, is of situations. Of special interest is the commonality of individual power to fight against the oppression and the social context in which this strife takes place. It is only in a democracy that this transformation can take place. However, as Powell rightly said, we have to "restore a sense of shame in this country" (quoted by Reeves, 1995d: 6B). How can a "magnificent country" restore its "sense of shame?" Is the ethos of an American Journey ( Powell, 1995) comparable to the pathos of the Mulis' life history in a "wounded civilization" ( Naipaul, 1977)?

"[A] gulf has opened up in our culture between the visibility of evil and

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democracies of Unfreedom: The United States and India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Part I - THE CHIMERA OF THE AMERICAN DREAM 1
  • 1 - The Politics of Being 19
  • 2 - Race, Gender, and Class: An Encounter with Reality 21
  • 3 - Beyond the New Tribalism 35
  • 4 - The End of a Great Society 53
  • Part II - THE MANTRAS OF DENIAL 71
  • 5 - The Remains of Democracy 73
  • 6 - A New Caste War: The End of a Tradition 89
  • 7 - Toward the United States of India 101
  • 8 - Rediscovery of India 119
  • Epilogue - A Tale of Two Titans 135
  • Notes 143
  • Bibliography 145
  • Index 159
  • About the Author 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.