Energy, the Environment, and Public Policy: Issues for the 1990s

By David L. McKee | Go to book overview
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same sense of urgency and in similar terms as their neighbor to the north.


NOTES
1.
The data support this statement with respect to acid rain and water diversion in the prairie region. The evidence is not as compelling, however, in the case of Great Lakes water pollution. Regarding the acid rain issue, see John E. Carroll , Acid Rain: An Issue in Canadian-American Relations ( Toronto: C. D. Howe Institute, 1982). Water policy issues are discussed in John Whalley, Canada's Resource Industries and Water Export Policy ( Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1986). Great Lakes water quality is discussed in International Joint Commission, Upper Great Lakes Connecting Channels Study ( Toronto: IJC, 1988b); and Environment Canada, First Report of Canada Under the 1987 Protocol to the 1978 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement ( Toronto, 1988).
2.
The U.S. Senate has recently passed a new Clean Air Act that, in part, addresses airborne emissions affecting Canada and the United States. The Canadian government has strengthened dramatically certain provisions of its Clean Air Act of 1971.
3.
The various environmental agencies in the United States are organized by type of pollutant rather than by geographic area of concern. A small unit within the federal Environmental Protection Agency has responsibility for international pollution issues. This unit is the smallest in the agency and commands the fewest personnel resources. See Ann L. Brownson (ed.), Federal Staff Directory 1990/1 (Mount Vernon, VA: Staff Directories, Ltd.), p. 696.
4.
Canada Reports 2, no. 2, "Two Nations with a Shared Problem". See also Canadian Embassy, Acid Rain: Canada-U.S. Joint Report of the Special Envoys on Acid Rain ( 1988).
5.
The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1989 as reflected in U.S. 1630 passed the Senate on April 3, 1990. The House version of the bill, H.R. 3030, has not been voted on but contains very similar language as U.S. 1630. The administration has indicated strong support for the passage of the proposed legislation with minor alterations.

-155-

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