War, Cooperation, and Conflict: The European Possessions in the Caribbean, 1939-1945

By Fitzroy André Baptiste | Go to book overview
Save to active project

12
The Battle of the Caribbean: February 1942 to August 1943

To the United States, ABC-1 was a "definite commitment" to a Germany-first war strategy in collaboration with Britain. During the next eight months, the United States took several steps to implement this strategy. These steps included the relief of the British garrison in Iceland by United States forces in July 1941; the Atlantic conference between Roosevelt and Churchill in Placentia Bay off Argentia, Newfoundland between August 10 and 15, 1941; the United States' decision during September 1941 to assume full responsibility from Britain for the mid-Atlantic portion of British-Canadian-American convoys; the United States' baseconstruction program in the British Isles, Newfoundland, and the British Caribbean; the ABC agreement on command principles for the United States' leased bases in the British transatlantic possessions; and the establishment of an embryonic Allied Supreme Command structure. Astride the strategic Straits of Dakar, important steps included the Brazil-United States Joint Planning Agreement of July 24, 1941, and the entry of United States troops into Surinam in November 1941 in agreement with the Netherlands and Brazil.

Meanwhile, a number of naval incidents between September and November 1941 created an inexorable drive to total war between the United States and Germany. German submarines attacked the USS Greer,Kearney, and Reuben James on September 4, October 17, and October 3l, 1941, while they were engaged in support of British-Canadian convoys in the North Atlantic. In addition, about nine other incidents between the United States and German navies occurred between September 5 and November 6, 1941. The blow, however, which completed the transition from de facto to de jure war between the United States and Germany was dealt by Japan at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. By December 11, 1941, the United States found itself at war with the Axis in the Pacific and the Atlantic sea frontiers.1

Almost immediately, Roosevelt and Churchill met at the Washington conference between December 22, 1941, and January 14, 1942. They not only reconfirmed the Germany-first strategy of

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War, Cooperation, and Conflict: The European Possessions in the Caribbean, 1939-1945
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 351

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?