Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Family Issues

By Joan F. Kaywell | Go to book overview

Preface

This volume--focusing on family issues--was written in hope that the caretakers of our nation's distraught youth can acquire understanding and new knowledge on how to better help troubled teenagers cope with various family problems in healthier and more constructive ways. By combining the expertise of literacy experts with psychologists, psychiatrists, or therapists, perhaps together we can provide a means to increase these adolescents' literacy while offering them the special help they need.

As mentioned in the Series Foreword, my escape and my salvation during my teenage years came from books--not drugs, alcohol, sex, food, gangs, or guns. Think about young people who are both illiterate and in pain! Not too long ago--after experiencing extensive therapy for being a "severe trauma survivor"--I asked myself, "Is there anything we can do to help unfortunate teenagers with their problems while increasing their literacy skills?" Since most of our nation's prisoners are illiterate--the actingout side--and most homeless people are not exactly Rhodes scholars--the withdrawal side--it seems logical to try to help these adolescents while they are still within the educational system. I believe we can help, but all involved parties must learn how to communicate better; much can be learned by combining the expertise of different helping professionals.

Like education, psychology as a profession has become research based. Educators and parents, by and large, have not been exposed to various terms frequently used by counselors. I did not even know, for example, what a "severe trauma survivor" was, much less realize that I was one. With the exception of the opening chapter written by Chris Crutcher, who is a writer and

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Family Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.