Male Homosexual Behavior and the Effects of AIDS Education: A Study of Behavior and Safer Sex in New Zealand and South Australia

By B. R. Simon Rosser | Go to book overview
Different homosexual behaviors are non-random and cluster into a limited number of dimensions. There appears to be a fluidity of role in receptive and insertive practices. Across time and country, three patterns of behavior were discernible: an anally oriented, high HIV risk pattern; an orally oriented, low HIV risk pattern; and a sado-masochistic, high HIV risk pattern. Given the complexity of sexual behavior, it would appear reductionistic to simply dichotomize homosexual behavior as safe or unsafe.

NOTES
1.
Porn star Kurt Marshall, quoted in Rutledge [ 1988], p. 131.
2.
See Rosser [1988d].
3.
The stability of safer sex in the SA sample is the subject of Chapter 17, as it examines stability under special conditions. The reader is reminded that experimental interventions, covered in Chapter 16, occurred between measures. However, as these interventions did not significantly discriminate between the control condition and the other conditions, overall measures of safer sex and unsafe sex shall be used in comparing the NZ sample over time.
4.
For the definition of safer sex, see Chapter 2.
5.
Alternatively, it might be argued that this result is really an artifact of sampling bias, that is, that those already practicing safer sex were more likely to enter the study. However, three factors argue strongly against a sampling bias explanation. First, studies investigating volunteer bias in sexual behavior research indicate that rather than the sexually conservative, it is the more sexually experienced and exclusively homosexual who are likely to respond to such studies [ Burdick & Stewart, 1974; Wolchik, Braver & Jensen, 1985]. Second, recruitment strategies varied across the samples yet produced similar results. In NZ recruitment both within the gay community and in the wider general community was as wide as possible but avoided volunteers from clinical settings, while in SA volunteers were recruited from the local AIDS/STD clinic and gay organizations, with less advertising in the general media. Third, examination of the demographic characteristics of the sample revealed considerable heterogeneity in the sample on variables such as age, socio-economic status, and marital status. (See Chapter 3 for precise details.)
6.
X2 = 4.60, df = 1, p ≪.05. This finding cannot be attributed to differential rates of return between those practicing safer sex at baseline and those not doing so. While in the total NZ sample 119 of 159 (74.7%) were identified as practicing safer sex, 106 of 140 (75.7%) of those who filled in the follow-up questionnaire practiced safer sex at baseline, a non-significant difference, X2 = 0.033, df = 1, ns.
7.
From these data it should not be assumed that respondents were unwilling to change their sexual behavior. Coleman [ 1990] has documented the profoundly debilitating effects of obsessive-compulsive sexual behavior (OCSB), where the person experiences no choice in his or her actions and, indeed, may be profoundly disturbed by his or her behavior and/or thoughts. Coleman, Rosser, and Strapko [ 1990] argue that OCSB needs to be recognized as dysfunctional and distinguished from developmental and other homosexual behavior. At least for some homosexually active men, they assert, unsafe sex needs to be identified and understood to be a manifestation of OCSB and so treated with appropriate psychotherapeutic and pharmacological intervention.
8.
Wood et al., [ 1988].

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Male Homosexual Behavior and the Effects of AIDS Education: A Study of Behavior and Safer Sex in New Zealand and South Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.