The Political Economy of Rural Development in China, 1978-1999

By Weixing Chen | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is an outcome of my research on rural China over the last five years and summarizes many themes of my previous research. My research interest in rural China grew out of my own experience in rural China. Like millions of high school graduates in China in the mid-1970s, I was sent to a poor, remote village in Qufu county of Shandong province upon graduation in 1975. I stayed in the village for two years. I did not realize until many years later that those two short years had a great impact on me personally and intellectually.

I owe a great deal to many individuals and one institution in the production of this book. Of all the people who provided aid and inspiration, I must single out Brantly Womack, to whom I owe an intellectual debt for my becoming an active scholar. Brantly was my academic advisor and dissertation director while I was a Ph.D. candidate at Northern Illinois University. On a personal level, Brantly was a dear friend, always ready to help. On an intellectual level, he was stimulating and rigorous but not rigid. Without his support, I would not have achieved a successful academic career. I benefited greatly from Brantly's constructive insights at various stages of this project.

My colleagues at East Tennessee State University played an irreplaceable role in the production of this book. I wish to thank Kenneth Mijeski, Andrew Battista, and Hugh LaFollette for their friendship, support, and generous help. Kenneth Mijeski, in his capacity as the chair of the Political Science Department of East Tennessee State University, did all he could to facilitate my research by reducing my teaching load and by

-ix-

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The Political Economy of Rural Development in China, 1978-1999
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • 1 - Ideology and Economic Development 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - A Party of Economics and Market-Oriented Communal Socialism 29
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - The Dengist Reform in Historical Perspective 47
  • Notes 68
  • 4 - The Village Conglomerate: A New Form of Political Economy 71
  • Notes 98
  • 5 - The Peasant Challenge at the Turn of the Century 101
  • Notes 117
  • 6 - Village Elections for Self-Government 119
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - A New Ideological Discourse: Deng Xiaoping Theory 137
  • Notes 153
  • 8 - Understanding the Political Economy of Development 155
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 169
  • About the Author *
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