Interstate Relations: The Neglected Dimension of Federalism

By Joseph F. Zimmerman | Go to book overview

concessions. The ABC, CBS, and NBC television networks are examples of firms that received economic concessions after threatening to leave New York City for New Jersey.

A state's industrial development strategy based upon tax and other fiscal incentives can suffer from major disadvantages. The incentives shift the tax burden to other taxpayers during the tax exemption period; impose opportunity costs by depriving the state of tax revenues essential for solving other state problems, such as educational and environmental ones; are not always successful as illustrated by the closure of the Volkswagen plant in Pennsylvania; and can be described as a zero sum game if new firms are attracted only from sister states in the region. Furthermore, the use of incentives to lure companies from other states can generate bad relations among states.

The National Governors' Association has recognized the problems generated by interstate competition for business firms. The association's guidelines for the use of tax and other incentives by a state to attract business firms are sensible ones, but unfortunately are dependent for success upon voluntary compliance by all states.

Congress could employ its commerce and tax policies to regulate interstate competition for industry but has evidenced little inclination to do so beyond imposing a cap on the volume of tax exempt bonds that may be used to help finance private business activities.

Chapter 9 examines another type of interstate competition -- efforts by states to maximize their tax revenues by exporting the burden to individuals and firms in sister states.


NOTES
1
Gary Enos, "Big Breaks Lure Plant to Ky"., City & State, June 21, 1993, p. 1.
2
Charles Mahtesian, "How States Get People to Love Them", Governing, January 1994, p. 44.
5
"N.Y.P.D. Freebie", Forbes, April 10, 1995, p. 22.
7
"Cuomo Warns N.J. to let Yankees Alone", Times Union ( Albany, N.Y.), October 7, 1993, p. B-2.
8
Pete Dougherty, "The Yanks Are Going -- to Norwich", Times Union ( Albany, N.Y.), March 15, 1994, pp. 1 and A-7.
9
Bob Croce, "Firebirds Moving Home Base to Vermont", Times Union ( Albany, N.Y.), May 14, 1994, pp. 1 and A-7.
10
See, for example, Constitution of New York, Art. VII, §§9-12 ( 1846).
11
Constitution of New York, Art. VII, §8 ( 1894).
12
"New Wars Between the States", New England Business Review, October 1963,

-158-

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Interstate Relations: The Neglected Dimension of Federalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Relations between States 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Referee Role of the Supreme Court 17
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - Interstate Compacts and Agreements 33
  • Notes 55
  • 4 - Full Faith and Credit 59
  • Notes 81
  • 5 - Privileges and Immunities 87
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Refidition of Fugitives from Justice 103
  • Notes 114
  • 7 - Interstate Economic Protectionism 117
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Interstate Competition for Tourists, Sports Franchises, and Business Firms 141
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - Interstate Tax Revenue Competition 161
  • Notes 180
  • 10 - Formal and Informal Interstate Cooperation 185
  • Notes 207
  • 11 - Model for Improved Interstate Relations 213
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 259
  • About the Author *
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