Historical Dictionary of School Segregation and Desegregation: The American Experience

By Jeffrey A. Raffel | Go to book overview
Save to active project

T

JAEUBER INDEX.SeeIndex of Dissimilarity.

TIPPING POINT. A specific percentage level of blacks in a school or neighborhood that is the threshold at which the black enrollment or population will continue to increase until the school or neighborhood becomes segregated and black. The tipping point of a school is the percentage of black or minority student enrollment at which whites leave (white flight*) or will not come because they fear that the school will decline or become all black. This term was used more in the 1960s and 1970s than thereafter. In Forced Justice David Armor * estimates the tipping point of schools as 50 percent black. Christine Rossell* and Armor also view the degree of flight as a function of where the school is located, the voluntary* versus the mandatory* nature of a school desegregation plan,* and other factors rather than simply as the result of a particular minority percentage of enrollment.

Ottensmann ( 1995) calls for a "Requiem for the Tipping-Point Hypothesis," at least with respect to residential neighborhood change. The tipping-point hypothesis assumes that racially mixed neighborhoods are inherently unstable, for as the tipping point is reached, whites will leave and/or not move into the area and the percentage of blacks will therefore increase. But studies of the 1980 and 1990 censuses indicate that many neighborhoods remained racially mixed or even increased their percentage of whites during this time period. Ottensmann argues that this change may be due to the greater stability in black population in cities, unlike the previous decades when the black population was greatly increasing and needed to locate somewhere. But whatever the cause, the result

-252-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Historical Dictionary of School Segregation and Desegregation: The American Experience
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 345

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?