Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality

By Jeannine Swift | Go to book overview
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income housing stock, jobs shifting to the suburbs, strained employment markets, rising crime and drug trafficking, business closures and disinvestment in poor and minority neighborhoods, and a host of other problems. Until blacks, a group that makes up one-fourth of the region's population, share more fully in the resources of the South, there will not be a New South.


NOTES
1.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Develoment, Report of the President's Commission for a National Agenda for the Eighties Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980), 165-69; John D. Kasarda , "The Implications of Contemporary Distribution Trends for National Urban Policy," Social Science Quarterly 61 ( December 1980): 373-400.
2.
John D. Kasarda, Michael D. Irvin, and Holly L. Hughes, "The South Is Still Rising," American Demographics 8 ( June 1986): 34.
3.
Robert D. Bullard, "Blacks in the New South: Problems and Prospects," paper presented at the Mid-South Sociological Association Meeting, Memphis ( October 1987): 1.
4.
David C. Perry and Alfred J. Watkins, The Rise of the Sunbelt Cities (Beverly Hills, CA: Sage, 1977): 77.
5.
Chet Fuller, "I Hear Them Call It the New South," Black Enterprise 12 ( November 1981): 41.
7.
William C. Matney and Dwight L. Johnson, America's Black Population: A Statistical View 1970-1982 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1983), 1.
8.
Ibid. , 2; Isaac Robinson, "Blacks Move Back to the South," American Demographics 9 ( June 1986) 40-43.
9.
Kasarda et al., "The South Is Still Rising,"32.
10.
Gurney Breckenfeld, "Refilling the Metropolitan Doughnut," in The Rise of the Sunbelt Cities, ed. David C. Perry and Alfred J. Watkins, (Beverly Hills, CA: Sage, 1977), 238.
11.
See Robert D. Bullard, Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust (College Station, TX: Texas A&M University, 198-7), Chapter 1.
12.
See Virginia Van der Veer Hamilton, Alabama: A Bicentennial History ( New York: W.W. Norton, 1977), 139.
13.
William J. Wilson, The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, The Underclass, and Public Policy ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), 180-81.
14.
John D. Kasarda, "Caught in the Web of Change," Society 21 ( 1983): 41-47; also William J. Wilson, "The Black Underclass," Wilson Quarterly (Spring 1984): 88-89.

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