Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality

By Jeannine Swift | Go to book overview

fate. Such an outcome, to cite the Chicago Tribune, would be "inconceivable for a nation this moral, [and] unbelievably stupid for a nation this smart11." (48) In truth, finding solutions to the problems of black youths and the underclass is a moral imperative for all of society, not just the black middle class, and is no less compelling for the improvidence, indolence, or other alleged deficits of the poor.


NOTES

The helpful comments of Michael Gordon, Herbert Hunter and Earl Smith on an earlier draft are gratefully acknowledged.

1.
On youth poverty, see Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, "Characteristics of the Population below the Poverty Level: 1982," Series P-60 ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1982); on unemployment, see Department of Labor, Employment and Training Report of the President ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1982), and Richard Freeman and Harry Holzer, eds., The Black Youth Employment Crisis ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986); on school dropouts, see Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, "School Enrollment: Social and Economic Characteristics of Students," Series P-20 ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing office, 1986); on youth crime and delinquency, see Department of Justice, Uniform Crime Reports for the United States ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1986); on unwed teenage pregnancies, see National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics of the U.S. (various editions).
2.
U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1982.
3.
William J. Wilson, "Inner-City Dislocations," Society 21 ( Nov/ Dec. 1983): 83.
4.
John D. Kasarda, "Caught in the Web of Change," Society 21 ( Nov/ Dec. 1983): 41.
5.
Eleanor Holmes Norton, "Restoring the Traditional Black Family," New York Times Magazine, June 2, 1985, 43.
6.
Nicholas Lemann, "The Origins of the Underclass," The Atlantic Monthly 257 ( June/July 1986): 31-55.
7.
Glen C. Loury, "The Moral Quandary of the Black Community," Public Interest 79 (Spring 1985): 11.
8.
Anthony Downs, "The Future of Industrial Cities," in The New Urban Reality, ed. Paul Peterson ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1985), 292.
9.
Committee on Policy for Racial Justice, Black Initiative and Government Responsibility ( Washington, D.C.: Joint Center for Political Studies, 1987), 5-6.
11.
Daniel P. Moynihan, Maximum Feasible Misunderstanding ( New York: Free Press, 1970): 198.
12.
Charles Murray, Losing Ground: American Social Policy 1951-1980 ( New York: Basic Books, 1984), 217.

-65-

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