Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality

By Jeannine Swift | Go to book overview

the rivers from their pollution because they will know that if you do not redeem the rivers, you are killing your great-grand children. So I expect that that is where I am going from here, I am going to look for folks who are really serious about giving themselves to serious work. So when Harris Wofford asked what America would be like if we had twenty- five more years of King changing, moving; if we had had twenty-five more years of Malcolm changing, developing, if we had had twenty-five more years of Ruby Doris Smith changing, moving; when he asked that, I said, "Well, that's really not the main question, the main question is an answer." Look around you, there are folks here who have got lots more than twenty-five years to develop. I see you, some of you have thirty years, some of you have forty years, some of you have fifty years, some of you have even more years than I do, maybe sixty years, to grow and to change. I see Jonathan, I see Leslie, I see Christopher, I see Christine, I see Michelle, I see Claudia, I see all of Frank's young folks, and what I know is that these folks know how much they have been loved and cared for. I see you, I know you have a long time to go, and I am for you; that is where I go from here. I go with you, and now I realize and I think, we realize that a conference like this opens up the options to us.

Where do we go from here? No, Martin, not just chaos or community; I think we have got three options when we are serious and honest with each other about where we go from this kind of experience. We can go right on to where America seems to be wanting to go and that is to social chaos where nobody is responsible for anybody else, sometimes even in the same household. That is one option, social chaos. A second option that Martin didn't talk about but which he knew about is the option of paranoid individualism and personal isolationism whether hiding in religion; hiding in money; hiding in sex; or hiding in drugs; but essentially hiding from everybody else and living a life only for ourselves. Social chaos or personal chaos; committing social suicide or personal suicide. But I think there is always the third option: the option of the compassionate community: that is the hard option. That is the option that a lot of people believe is unrealistic. Well, King said that if that does not become our reality, we are all going to be burning up soon.

Where do we go? Some of us, maybe more than I realize, at least some of us, are going to give our lives and our skills and our resources of every kind to continue the struggle that made it possible for us to be here. Some of us are going to carry on the tradition that our foreparents and other folks' foreparents began for us. Some of us are going to go on trying to reshape the modern black struggle for freedom and justice, for equality and transformation. And some of us have already discovered it: that it is a struggle that we can gladly share with all others who are truly committed to freedom, to justice, to equality, to transformation.

Where do we go from here? To create a new reality, of course, to create a new reality based on a new vision, based on a new people that is made up of many peoples, to struggle for a new society starting with me, you, me. Here we come, Malcolm; here we come, Martin. Open the way, Ruby Doris, Ella Baker, we are on your path. That's where we go from here.


NOTES
1.
Langston Hughes, "Let America Be America Again," lines 62-64, in America in Poetry, ed. Charles Sullivan ( New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1988), 185.
2.
Ibid, lines 65-69.
3.
Langston Hughes, "Freedom's Plow," lines 9-10, in HughesLangston

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 162

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.