Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality

By Jeannine Swift | Go to book overview

About the Editor and the Contributors

JACK BLOOM is the author of Class, Race and The Civil Rights Movement published by Indiana University Press in 1987. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley and is currently Associate Professor of Sociology at Indiana University Northwest. In the summer of 1988, he was Visiting Associate Professor at Warsaw University in Poland. He has also written and lectured on class and ethnic conflict in Kenya.

RHODA LOIS BLLMERG is Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University and specializes in Racial and Ethnic Relations, Women's Studies, Social Movements, and Complex Organizations. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and held a Fulbright-Hayes Research Scholarship in India in 1966-67. She has written a number of books, including Civil Rights: The 1960's Freedom Struggle, and Indian Women in Transition: A Bengalore Case.

JULIAN BOND was recently a Visiting Professor at Harvard University. He was an active member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Having been elected three times to the Georgia House of Representatives, but barred from taking office, he served four terms beginning in 1967 af ter the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the legislators had erred in not permitting him to take office. In 1968 he was nominated as Vice President of the United States at the Democratic convention, but withdrew his name because he did not meet the age requirement.

ROBERT D. BULLARD is a visiting scholar and Associate Professor of Sociology in the Energy Resources Group at the University of California at Berkeley. He was previously on the faculty at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He is the author of numerous publications on the African-American Experience including Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust.

GEORGE E. DICKINSON is Professor and Chair in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. He has taught at Morehead State University in Kentucky, Memphis State, Pennsylvania State University at University Park, and a number of other universities. In addition to his work on the behavior and attitudes of adolescents, Dr. Dickinson has a number of publications in the area of death education and attitudes toward dying. The Sociology of the Family and

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Dream and Reality: The Modern Black Struggle for Freedom and Equality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: A Tale of Two and One-Half Decades 3
  • Notes 11
  • 2: A Tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr. 13
  • 3: Rediscovering Women Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement 19
  • Conclusion 26
  • Notes 26
  • 4: The Civil Rights Movement: Upheaval and Organization 29
  • Conclusion 39
  • Notes 40
  • 5: Blacks and the New South: Civil Rights in the Eighties 43
  • Introduction 43
  • Conclusion 49
  • Notes 50
  • 6: Improving the Plight of Black, Inner-City Youths: Whose Responsibility? 53
  • Notes 65
  • 7: Racial Attitudes of Black and White Adolescents Before and After Desegregation 69
  • Conclusion 73
  • Notes 74
  • 8: The Ills of Integration: A Black Perspective 77
  • Introduction 77
  • Notes 84
  • 9: A Dream Deferred for Quality Education: Civil Rights Legislation and De Facto Segregation in the Cincinnati Schools, 1954-1986 87
  • Notes 91
  • 10: The Housing Conditions of Black Americans: 1960s-1980s 93
  • Conclusion 98
  • Notes 105
  • 11: The Collapse of the Employment Policy Agenda: 1964-1981 107
  • Introduction 107
  • Conclusion 120
  • Notes 121
  • 12: Black Workers at Risk: Jobs for Life or Death 125
  • Conclusion 131
  • Notes 133
  • 13: "Where Do We Go from Here" 137
  • Notes 144
  • Index 147
  • About the Editor and the Contributors 153
  • Hofstra University's Cultural and Intercultural Studies Coordinating Editor, Alexej Ugrinsky 157
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