The Gay Nineties in America: A Cultural Dictionary of the 1890s

By Robert L. Gale | Go to book overview

C

Cable, George Washington (1844-1925). Author. He was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. After his father died ( 1859), young Cable quit school and clerked in a New Orleans warehouse and then for a grocer to support his mother and sisters. He served in the Confederate cavalry during the Civil War (1863-1865), was wounded twice, clerked again, was sick with malaria, then worked off and on for cotton businessmen ( 1869-1881) and also as a newspaperman (from 1869) before becoming a popular short-story writer and novelist, and then an unpopular defender of the rights of Southern blacks. He published sketches in the New Orleans Picayune and began in the 1870s to gain national prominence by publishing the first local-color stories focusing on the postbellum South in Scribner's Magazine* (edited by Richard Watson Gilder,* later Cable's friend) and Appleton's Journal. Cable began to correspond with H. H. Boyesen* ( 1877). Cable Old Creole Days ( 1879) is a collection of stories. The success of his powerful novel The Grandissimes: A Story of Creole Life ( 1880, rev. 1883), concerning slavery and voodooism, mixed-blood angers, and a feud between aristocratic families at the time of the Louisiana Purchase, gave Cable confidence enough to devote himself full-time to writing (from 1881). Resentment of his study The Creoles of Louisiana ( 1884, illustrated by Joseph Pennell*) helped to persuade Cable to move with his family to Connecticut ( 1884), then Northampton, Massachusetts ( 1885). ( Cable's mother was from New England.)

Cable and his friend Mark Twain* went on a rollicking lecture tour together ( 1884), managed by James B. Pond;* Twain paid Cable $450 a week plus expenses for a twenty-week run. Cable essays "The Convict Lease System in the Southern States" ( 1884) and "The Freedman's Case in Equity" ( 1885) caused him to be further disliked in certain Southern quarters for espousing the cause of African Americans. He even invited (though without success) the African-American writer Charles W. Chesnutt* to be his private secretary ( 1887). Cable's later books are Bonaventure: A Prose Pastoral of Acadian Louisiana*

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Gay Nineties in America: A Cultural Dictionary of the 1890s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xi
  • CHRONOLOGY xiii
  • LIST OF ENTRIES xix
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 45
  • D 89
  • E 109
  • F 119
  • G 141
  • H 159
  • I 193
  • J 197
  • K 209
  • L 213
  • M 227
  • N 255
  • O 263
  • P 269
  • R 293
  • S 315
  • T 353
  • U 373
  • V 379
  • W 383
  • Y 409
  • A NINETIES BIBLIOGRAPHY 413
  • CLASSIFIED APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL ENTRIES IN KEY OCCUPATIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES 423
  • Index 429
  • About the Author 459
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 462

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.