Economic Policy in the Carter Administration

By Anthony S. Campagna | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Summary and Critique of the Administration's Macroeconomic Policies

The previous chapters included many comments and criticisms of the Carter administration's macroeconomic policies. Inevitably, many criticisms were made immediately following the actual policies adopted. They were not, however, spelled out or put in any kind of context, and so appear to be ad hoc notes on specific policies. Now, we gather up these criticisms and try to make some sense of the administration's attempt to deal with the macroeconomic issues it faced.

The task is easier said than done. Not only must we discuss what the administration planned to do as it took office, but also how it amended these plans either in the face of actual events in the economic world, or in response to political and social pressures. No administration can control these external events, but how it reacts to them reveals a great deal about the existence of and commitment to a basic philosophy.


TWO CARTER ADMINISTRATIONS?

The Carter administration was divided into two terms. One in which it tried to adhere to its basic convictions, and the other when it appeared to abandon them. In terms of its macroeconomic policies, the first one did not last very long, less than half of the term. Buffeted by events it could not control, it vacillated, compromised, and eventually retreated. The administration was then forced to examine its convictions and found them to be fluid, especially when Carter's personal philosophy seemed to re-emerge. In the second half of his tenure, external events seemed to take control, and the administration succumbed to confronting specific issues and abandoning its rudder. It made concessions, overreacted to short-run incidents, and in general sacrificed its objectives as it was swept along by the waves it could not handle. In the process, it became difficult to discern

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Policy in the Carter Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.