Planning for the Nation's Health: A Study of Twentieth-Century Developments in the United States

By Grace Budrys | Go to book overview

5
Evaluating Health Planning

Over the years evaluations of health planning have become increasingly more sophisticated in their approach and elegant in their form of presentation. The earliest reports were not only less sophisticated and less elegant, they were addressed to a different set of issues. This chapter attempts to capture the perspective from which the problems associated with developing a health planning enterprise were being viewed during the second half of the twentieth century, when health planning entered the era of public sector participation in planning (phase 11 of the four-phase sequence identified earlier). The review of the literature is organized in chronological order beginning with the years immediately following the enactment of the two initial public sector planning programs -- the RMP in 1965 and CHP in 1966. However, this review is not exhaustive, since the amount of material that could be included in such a review is far too extensive. However, the reader is directed to literature reviews which became available at various points in time along the way.


DESCRIBING THE BEGINNINGS OF THE PLANNING EFFORT

One of the earliest references to the health planning legislation that came into existence during this era (RMP and CHP) can be found in the American Journal of Public Health. Anticipating the need for guidance in interpreting the new laws, the officials of the American Public Health Association ( APHA) published a set of guidelines in the December 1966 issue of the journal. The guidelines advocated including representatives of all relevant agencies in the planning process including health departments, and public and private mental health agencies, welfare departments, and professional schools and voluntary agencies ( 1966,

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Planning for the Nation's Health: A Study of Twentieth-Century Developments in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Topic of Health Planning 1
  • Part I - The History of Health Planning 9
  • 2 - Health Planning Proposals and Programs 11
  • 3 - The Effects of Health Planning over Time 27
  • 4 - The Rise and Decline of Professional Control 37
  • 5 - Evaluating Health Planning 51
  • Part II - The Urban HSA 73
  • 6 - The Participants' Evaluation of Success 75
  • 7 - The Emergence of Groups 87
  • 8 - The "Teeth" in the Law That Didn't Work 103
  • Part III - Summary and implications 111
  • 9 - Conclusions 113
  • Appendix 135
  • References 139
  • Index 155
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.