No Easy Walk to Freedom: Reconstruction and the Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment

By James E. Bond | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project spanned more than a decade, during most of which I served as dean of the University of Puget Sound School of Law. As one might surmise from the dedication to this book, that deanship entailed very few frustrations. The major one was my inability to get this book written. Most of the primary research had been done by the time I moved to Tacoma in 1986, but it sat boxed for the next seven years, largely untouched except for two month-long, ultimately futile efforts to make some sense of thousands of note cards and barely legible microfilm copies.

When I was finally able to return to the project in the summer of 1993, I discovered to my horror that much of the microfilm copy had deteriorated and was unreadable. Consequently, I had to retrace my research trips to the major libraries in most of the Southern states. The one consolation was that the quality of the reader-printers had improved vastly during the intervening years. The policies regarding their use were as disparate and idiosyncratic as ever, however. Still, the librarians everywhere were unfailingly helpful, and I thank them.

Over the course of this project, I incurred countless other debts. The Earhart Foundation generously funded my research efforts. The Frances and Sidney Lewis Law Center at the Washington and Lee University School of Law kindly allowed me to spend a month there during the summer of 1989; and during that period I did develop a tentative and very general outline of the book. Kelly Kunsch, a public service librarian at the Seattle University School of Law, cheerfully answered my endless pleas for help. Bonnie Speir, my research assistant this past year, determinedly chased down every errant footnote and meticulously proofed the final two drafts. Dee Wakefield and Liz Dorsett, the school's special projects secretaries, typed draft after draft without complaint; and Jill Branham, a former administrative assistant, prepared the camera-ready copy with her usual pleasant dispatch.

-ix-

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No Easy Walk to Freedom: Reconstruction and the Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - The Remembered Past of the Fourteenth Amendment 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Ratification in Tennessee 15
  • Notes 26
  • 3 - Ratification in Mississippi 33
  • Notes 47
  • 4 - Ratification in North Carolina 53
  • Notes 65
  • 5 - Ratification in Louisiana 75
  • Notes 95
  • 6 - Ratification in Alabama 101
  • Notes 114
  • 7 - Ratification in South Carolina 121
  • Notes 137
  • 8 - Ratification in Virginia 143
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - Ratification in Florida 169
  • Notes 183
  • 10 - Ratification in Arkansas 189
  • Notes 205
  • 11 - Ratification in Texas 211
  • Notes 225
  • 12 - Ratification in Georgia 231
  • Notes 245
  • 13 - The Imagined Future of the Fourteenth Amendment 251
  • Notes 272
  • Selected Bibliography 275
  • Index 289
  • About the Author 297
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