No Easy Walk to Freedom: Reconstruction and the Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment

By James E. Bond | Go to book overview

leges--to abolish the belief of the white man in the essential inferiority of the black. . . . It was impossible that any such attempt should succeed. 97

Black Virginians offered another verdict: "For the Virginia Negro there was truly no hiding place and no refuge from the long arm of white supremacy. Even the scales of justice could not be made to balance when Negro rights and equal treatment were concerned. For many, in their bitterness, the Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth Amendment seemed to be hollow victories, while the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments were a mockery." 98


NOTES
1.
Virginius Dabney, Virginia: The New Dominion ( Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1971), 353 ("Virginia had been the chief battleground of the war, and the physical devastation there was greater than in any other southern state"). Testifying before the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, Reverend Robert McCurdy said: "It is impossible to make [Virginia's] physical humiliation more complete than it is." U.S. Congress, Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, 39th Cong., 1st Sess., Part II, 92.
2.
Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State of Virginia, Convened in the City of Richmond December 8 by an Order of General Schofield Dated November 2, 1867, in Pursuance of the Act of Congress of March 29, 1867 ( Richmond: Office of the New Nation, 1867), 545.
3.
Although Arkansas, Louisiana, and Tennessee all had been "restored" under Lincoln's "10 percent plan" prior to the end of the war, they all had had military governors. There was no military governor in occupied Virginia. Francis Pierpont, the loyalist who had presided over the birth of West Virginia, subsequently moved his Virginia government to Alexandria, where it had survived under the protection of federal troops.
4.
Cf. R. Lowe, "Republicans, Rebellion, and Reconstruction: The Republican Party in Virginia, 1856-1870" (Ph.D. diss., University of Virginia, 1968), 133 (the "midget" size of "restored Virginia" was almost "farcical").
5.
Fredericksburg New Era, 27 June 1865.
6.
Hamilton J. Eckenrode, The Political History of Virginia during Reconstruction ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1904), 30.
7.
Lewis McKenzie said in his testimony before the Reconstruction Committee: "When that legislature went to Richmond, they altered the constitutional provisions in such a manner that I found that the loyal men of the State were to be totally sacrificed and turned over to the power of the secessionists." U.S. Congress, Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, 39th Cong., 1st Sess., Part II, 11.
8.
Alexandria Gazette, 13 June 1865. Early in June 1865, Negroes in Petersburg also "met publically to advocate Negro suffrage." See also Richard L. Morton, Philip A. Bruce , and Lyon G. Tyler, History of Virginia vol. 3 ( New York: American Historical Society, 1924), 80; and Lowe, "Republicans, Rebellion, and Reconstruction,"203-4. Cf. True Index, 10 February 1866 (reports that a freedmen's convention, while opposing universal Negro suffrage, "advocated the voting of colored people who could read and write well; and who possessed certain property qualifications").
9.
Alexandria Gazette, 8 July 1865; Fredericksburg New Era, 18 July 1865.

-158-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
No Easy Walk to Freedom: Reconstruction and the Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - The Remembered Past of the Fourteenth Amendment 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Ratification in Tennessee 15
  • Notes 26
  • 3 - Ratification in Mississippi 33
  • Notes 47
  • 4 - Ratification in North Carolina 53
  • Notes 65
  • 5 - Ratification in Louisiana 75
  • Notes 95
  • 6 - Ratification in Alabama 101
  • Notes 114
  • 7 - Ratification in South Carolina 121
  • Notes 137
  • 8 - Ratification in Virginia 143
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - Ratification in Florida 169
  • Notes 183
  • 10 - Ratification in Arkansas 189
  • Notes 205
  • 11 - Ratification in Texas 211
  • Notes 225
  • 12 - Ratification in Georgia 231
  • Notes 245
  • 13 - The Imagined Future of the Fourteenth Amendment 251
  • Notes 272
  • Selected Bibliography 275
  • Index 289
  • About the Author 297
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.