Wines in the Wilderness: Plays by African American Women from the Harlem Renaissance to the Present

By Elizabeth Brown-Guillory | Go to book overview

SHIRLEY GRAHAM (1896-1977)

It's Mornin' ( 1940)


BIOGRAPHY AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Shirley Lola Graham was born on November 11, 1896, on a farm near Evansville, Indiana, to Reverend David Andrew and Etta Bell Graham. Along with four brothers, Shirley Graham grew up in parsonages across the country. It was her father, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, who became a major influence on her life, particularly because he instilled in her a drive to explore the lives of black heroes and a desire to study African culture and music.

After graduating from Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane, Washington, Graham entered a trade school where she became a certified typist and office clerk. Towards the end of World War I, she moved to Seattle where she worked at the Navy Yard until she married Shadrach T. McCanns in 1921. Two sons were born, Robert and David, before the marriage was dissolved in the mid-twenties.

In 1926, when Shirley Graham's father was appointed administrator of a mission college in Monrovia, Liberia, she and her sons moved to Paris where she studied music at the Sorbonne. Beginning in the late 1920s through 1931, Graham studied and served as a music librarian at Howard University and later headed the music department of Morgan State College in Baltimore, Maryland. Graham earned a B.A. and an M.A. in music from Oberlin College in 1934 and 1935, respectively. After leaving Oberlin College, she served as chair of the department of fine arts at Tennessee A. & I. State College in Nashville.

Wishing to develop further expertise in theater, Graham accepted the position of director at the Chicago unit of the Federal Theater Project (FTP) in 1936, and underwent intensive study of the technical aspects of theater, including acting, directing, dance, and working on full-scale productions at Vassar College. Between 1936 and 1938 Graham wrote, designed, and

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wines in the Wilderness: Plays by African American Women from the Harlem Renaissance to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • MARITA BONNER (1899-1971) 1
  • GEORGIA, DOUGLAS JOHNSON (1880-1966) 11
  • EUILALIE SPENCE (1894-1981) 39
  • May Miller (1899- ) 61
  • SHIRLEY GRAHAM (1896-1977) 79
  • ALICE CHILDRESS (1920-) 97
  • SONIA SANCHEZ (1934 -- ) 151
  • SYBIL KEIN (1939- ) 163
  • ELIZABETH BROWN- GUILLORY (1954-) 185
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 249
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.