Wines in the Wilderness: Plays by African American Women from the Harlem Renaissance to the Present

By Elizabeth Brown-Guillory | Go to book overview

ELIZABETH BROWN- GUILLORY (1954-)

Mam Phyllis ( 1985)


BIOGRAPHY AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Elizabeth Brown-Guillory was born on June 20, 1954, in Lake Charles, Louisiana, to Marjorie Savoie Brown and Leo Brown. Along with seven siblings, she grew up in rural Church Point, Louisiana, having grandparents and parents who spoke Creole or a French patois. She attended Our Mother of Mercy Catholic School through eighth grade and graduated from Church Point High School with distinction in 1972.

She earned a B. A. in 1975 and an M. A. in 1977 in English from the University of Southwestern Louisiana ( USL). She began studying playwriting seriously at USL, under the direction of English professor and founder of The Eavesdrop Theater Paul Nolan. Her play Bayou Relics was first produced at The Eavesdrop Theater in 1976. She earned a Ph.D. in English and American literature in 1980 at Florida State University in Tallahassee.

She has taught at the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg and at Dillard University in New Orleans. She is currently an associate professor of English at the University of Houston. She is married to Lucius M. Guillory, a middle-school principal, and is the mother of one child, Lucia Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Brown-Guillory is the author of five produced plays: Bayou Relics, Mam phyllis, Somebody Almost Walked Off With All Of My Stuff, Marry Me, Again, and Snapshots of Broken Dolls. Two have been published by the Colorado Springs-based Contemporary Drama Service: Bayou Relics ( 1983) and Snapshots of Broken Dolls ( 1987), the latter produced off-Broadway in 1986.

Brown-Guillory's plays explore with pathos and comedy the lives of the elderly. Though the children of the elderly are usually the subjects of satire, they are sometimes given redeeming qualities. These insensitive children go on to learn how to heal old wounds. She also writes about the habits, beliefs, mannerisms, and values of the Louisiana Creoles of Color.

While continuing to write for the stage, Brown-Guillory has published

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