Higher Education in Transition: The Challenges of the New Millennium

By Joseph Losco; Brian L. Fife | Go to book overview
tion to do so as recipients of federal aid. Enforcement of reporting should be strengthened.Some solution must be found for students who cannot afford the cost of higher education without driving the general cost for all students upward. As we have seen, internal scholarships and price discounts have been a significant contributing factor to spiraling higher-education costs.Research and public service are also cost drivers, but these remain significant contributions that the academy makes to society at large. Greater research support from the private sector, which often reaps the harvest of university research, must be forthcoming.Administrative leaders must find new ways to do more with less. While technological advances may help in this regard in some areas of operation-- as in the case of lowered library costs -- care must be taken not to solve all problems with a technological fix (see, for example, the chapter by Cárdenas in this volume). The fact is that technology will continue to exert upward pressure on college costs unless policy makers and educators make judicious choices about how and when to employ technological innovation. Similarly, care in planning and appropriating for new physical facilities, efficiencies in operational functions and compliance with regulations, and consolidation of administrative functions all await the hand of the creative administrator.Finally, higher education must remain true to the humanistic roots that have taken it as far as it has come. One of the more significant features of institutional funding in recent years has been the precipitous decline in funding for instruction. Yet, classroom instruction -- characterized by some as inefficient and clumsy in this era of high technology -- must be funded at a level that recognizes that it remains the central mission of higher education and that there is simply no adequate substitute for personal and small-group intellectual exchange. These remain some of the more significant challenges for all of those interested in the cause of higher education in the twenty-first century, whether inside or outside the academy.
APPENDIX A
Variable Descriptions
Current Funds Expenditures and Transfers: Costs incurred for goods and services used for the purpose of operating the institution. This includes the acquisitions cost of capital assets, such as equipment and library books, to the extent that current funds are budgeted for and used by operating departments for such purposes. This includes the following: instruction, research, public service, academic support, student services, institutional support, operation and maintenance of the physical plant, scholarships and fellowships, auxiliary enterprises, hospitals, and independent operations. Auxiliary expenditures are essentially for selfsupporting operations of the institution that exist to provide a service to faculty, students, or staff, that charge a fee that is directly related to, although not neces

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