Higher Education in Transition: The Challenges of the New Millennium

By Joseph Losco; Brian L. Fife | Go to book overview
classification design currently includes about 3,600 universities and colleges in the United States that are degree granting and accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education. There are now eleven categories. This study focuses on doctoral-granting institutions only (there are four for both public and private institutions). The classification schemes are based largely on academic mission and are not intended to measure quality. Institutions are classified according to the following: highest level of degree offering, the number of degrees conferred by discipline, and the amount of federal support for research received by the institution. The four doctoral categories are as follows:
Research Universities I: These institutions award fifty or more doctoral degrees annually, offer a full range of baccalaureate programs, and receive $40 million or more annually in federal support.
Research Universities II: These institutions award fifty or more doctoral degrees annually, offer a full range of baccalaureate programs, and receive between $15.5 and $40 million annually in federal support.
Doctoral Universities I: These institutions award forty or more doctoral degrees annually in five or more disciplines and offer a full range of baccalaureate programs.
Doctoral Universities II: These institutions award at least ten doctoral degrees annually (in three or more disciplines), or twenty or more doctoral degrees in one or more disciplines and offer a full range of baccalaureate programs ( U.S. Department of Education, 1998a, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System 1995 [CD-Rom Version]. Washington, D.C.: National Center for Education Statistics Office of Educational Research and Improvement)

APPENDIX C
Carnegie Classified Doctoral Institutions

Public Institutions
Carnegie 11 (N = 59): University of Alabama-Birmingham; Arizona State University; University of Arizona; University of California-Berkeley; University of California-Davis; University of California-Irvine; University of California Los Angeles; University of California-San Diego; University of California-San Francisco; University of California-Santa Barbara; University of Colorado-Boulder; Colorado State University; University of Connecticut; Florida State University; University of Florida; Georgia Institute of Technology; University of Georgia; University of Hawaii-Manoa; University of Illinois-Chicago; University of Illinois Urbana; Indiana University; Iowa State University; University of Iowa; University of Kansas; University of Kentucky; Louisiana State University; University of Maryland-College Park; University of Massachusetts-Amherst; University of Michigan; Michigan State University; Wayne State University; University of Minnesota; University of Missouri-Columbia; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Rutgers University-New Brunswick; University of New Mexico; New Mexico State Univer

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education in Transition: The Challenges of the New Millennium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.