Higher Education in Transition: The Challenges of the New Millennium

By Joseph Losco; Brian L. Fife | Go to book overview

Private Institutions
Carnegie 11 (N = 29): California Institute of Technology; University of Southern California; Yale University; Georgetown University; Howard University; University of Miami; Emory University; University of Chicago; Northwestern University; Johns Hopkins University; Boston University; Harvard University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Tufts University; Washington University; Princeton University; Columbia University; Cornell University-Endowed Colleges; New York University; University of Rochester; Rockefeller University; Yeshiva University; Duke University; Case Western Reserve University; Carnegie Mellon University; University of Pennsylvania; Brown University; Vanderbilt University; and Stanford University.
Carnegie 12 (N = 11): George Washington University; University of Notre Dame; Tulane University; Brandeis University; Northeastern University; St. Louis University; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Syracuse University; Lehigh University; Rice University; and Brigham Young University.
Carnegie 13 (N = 23): Claremont Graduate School; U.S. International University; University of Denver; American University; Catholic University of America; Florida Institute of Technology; Nova Southeastern University; Clark Atlanta University; Illinois Institute of Technology; Loyola University of Chicago; Boston College; Andrews University; Adelphi University; Fordham University; Hofstra University; New School for Social Research; Polytechnic University; St. John's University; Teachers College at Columbia University; The Union Institute; Drexel University; Southern Methodist University; and Marquette University.
Carnegie 14 (N = 22): Biola University; University of Laverne; Loma Linda University; University of the Pacific; Pepperdine University; University of San Diego; University of San Francisco; DePaul University; Clark University; Worcester Polytechnic Institute; University of Detroit; Dartmouth College; Seton Hall University; Stevens Institute of Technology; Clarkson University; Pace University; Wake Forest University; University of Tulsa; Duquesne University; Allegheny University of the Health Sciences; Baylor University; and Texas Christian University. ( U.S. Department of Education, 1998b, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System-- 1995 [CD-Rom Version]. Washington, D.C.: National Center for Education Statistics Office of Educational Research and Improvement).

NOTES
1
The most recent survey of college prices shows that between the 1997-1998 and 1998-1999 academic years, average tuition for public two- and four-year institutions and for private two-year schools increased at a rate of 4 percent, approximately double the rate of inflation as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Tuition at private four-year schools increased an average of 5 percent ( College Entrance Examination Board, 1998).
2
There was some moderation of college prices between 1993 and 1996. When all forms of financial aid are subtracted from the total price of attending college, there was no significant increase in "net" price over this three year period (NCCHE,

-79-

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