Black Demographic Data, 1790-1860: A Sourcebook

By Clayton E. Cramer | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alterman Hyman. Counting People: The Census in History ( New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., 1969).

Bennett Pamela J., and Shirley S. McCord. Progress After Statehood: A Book of Readings ( Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Bureau, 1974).

Berlin Ira. Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1974).

Berwanger Eugene H. The Frontier Against Slavery: Western Anti- Negro Prejudice and the Slavery Extension Controversy ( Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1967).

Bickford Charlene Bangs, and Helen E. Veit, ed. Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986).

Bonomi Patricia U. Under the Cope of Heaven: Religion, Society, and Politics in Colonial America ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1986).

Brackney William H. The Baptists ( Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1994).

Brandt Nat. The Town That Started the Civil War ( Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1990).

Brown Letitia Woods. Free Negroes in the District of Columbia: 1790- 1846 ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1972).

Bruns Roger, ed. Am I Not A Man And a Brother: The Antislavery Crusade of Revolutionary America, 1688-1788 ( New York: Chelsea House, 1977).

Bureau of the Census. Negro Population in the United States 1790-1915 ( Washington: Government Printing Office, 1918; reprinted New York: Arno Press, 1968).

Census for 1820 ( Washington: Gales and Seaton, 1821; reprinted New York: Central Book Co., n.d.)

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Black Demographic Data, 1790-1860: A Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Limitations of Census Data 1
  • 2- Emancipation 7
  • 3- Manumission 19
  • 4- Internal Immigration Restrictions 31
  • 5- Disabilities, Slave-Dumping, And The 1840 Census 43
  • 6- International Black Migration 51
  • 7- Tables & Graphs 63
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author *
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