Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program

By Bram A. Hamovitch | Go to book overview

1
Introduction: At-Risk Students, Schools and Compensatory Education Programs

In the years since the early 1960s, there has been an explosion in the number and types of programs that try to assist students who are having difficulty in schools, or who are labeled as being at risk of having difficulty in the future. These compensatory education programs seek to remedy a problem or deficit that identified students are thought to have. It appears that the public supports these measures, as they are allocated relatively significant government resources. Yet, how much is really known about the operation of these programs?

This book explores a career-oriented compensatory education program that is designed to identify and then help to reintegrate poor, alienated high school students into their schools. I call it OSRP (Ordered School Reinforcement Program). As the staff see it, the program attempts to introduce order into the sometimes chaotic lives of the participating students. OSRP reinforces the schools in the sense that its main purpose is to convince its students to successfully reintegrate into their schools. Using ethnographic methods, I immersed myself in the activities of OSRP between January and July 1992.1 I found that most OSRP staff, students, and parents were not aware of the fact that the program failed to accomplish its main goal, successful school reintegration. I ask here why it failed, how it is that participants could be unaware of its failure, and what other avenues exist to address the equity issues raised by the perceived need for the program.

Problems commonly related to poor school performance include poverty, hunger, having a "deficient" family life, having a first language other than English, having a learning disability, being alienated from school, and exhibiting behavior problems in school. Compensatory education programs include, among others: school breakfast and lunch programs, Head Start, Follow Through, Title I remedial reading and math programs, peer tutoring, bilingual education programs, after-school job-related programs, desegregation programs, learning centers, special education programs, and grants for school districts having high concentrations of poor children.

There are several ways of looking at compensatory education. The most widely accepted view is that remedial programs help to "level the playing field" ( Ramey and Johnson, 1991; Ramey, 1992; U.S. Department of Education, 1993). This

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 140

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.