Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program

By Bram A. Hamovitch | Go to book overview

little bit safe and knowing the routine and they were to the point where they were going to start dealing with some things that matter to them. And that's when it was all stopped [by Gerald].... I still think it's because he had that close relationship in the summer. And that he couldn't separate himself, he couldn't abide. Because he had trouble enough with it the year before, but we successfully kept him out of our hair. Because he never really had his foot all the way in with the kids. That made it hard. Makes it very difficult.

Louise is arguing that Gerald feels a certain ownership of the kids' loyalty that he develops during the summer. She believes that he terminated her counseling because it competed with his special relationship with these young people. The salient point is that the curriculum in practice in this area (as in the others) departs significantly from the formal curriculum. Counseling, like job-trailing and OSRP classroom experiences, is an element of programming that fails to live up to images outlined in the formal curriculum.


CONCLUSION

OSRP, then, is a program that the state endorses as a success, and yet fails to accomplish its central goals. This chapter has identified some of the factors that may be responsible for this program's failure, including lack of staff time (possibly related to inadequate funding), ambiguous job-trailing organization, weak written curriculum, and special events that do not truly engage students. In chapter 1, I outlined a perspective of compensatory education that argues that many of these programs have the potential to succeed if enough planning and resources are poured into them. Some readers might agree with that perspective, arguing that Gerald and his staff have made tactical mistakes, that if corrected, would likely turn OSRP into a success. Some might blame the personal outlook of individual staff members for program weaknesses. Further, some might argue that increased funding would make a positive contribution to OSRP outcomes.

However, in subsequent chapters, it will become evident that OSRP's inability to realize its goals is more related to ideological and staff-student relational issues than to the above-mentioned elements. I found an underlying set of attitudes among staff members about the nature of the program that make its inability to fulfill its goals inevitable. I call that set of beliefs a "conservative ideology, of hope." Future chapters will explain the precise meaning of this set of ideas, and will show how it impacts upon OSRP curriculum in practice. Once some of the hidden underlying perspectives and practices within OSRP are better understood, it will be clear that superficial changes in programming or personnel are unlikely to produce positive outcomes.


NOTES
1.
Core subjects include English, mathematics, science, and social science. The reported changes in grades were obtained by subtracting students' final numeric grades in the four core subjects from their grades as reported on their first term grade report. Note that the total column does not add up to 100 percent because of rounding.

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Staying after School: At-Risk Students in a Compensatory Education Program
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1- Introduction: At-Risk Students, Schools and Compensatory Education Programs 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2- Osrp: Opportunity or Failure? 15
  • Notes 32
  • 3- A Conservative Ideology of Hope 35
  • 4- Staff Perceptions 53
  • Note 68
  • 5- Contradictory Relationships With Parents 69
  • Note 85
  • 6- Mixed Perceptions of the Schools 87
  • Notes 103
  • 7- Another Lost Opportunity 105
  • Appendix: Methods 123
  • References 127
  • Index 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 140

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.