Let Freedom Ring: A Documentary History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

By Peter B. Levy | Go to book overview

COPYRIGHT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Excerpt from An American Dilemma by Gunnar Myrdal. Copyright © 1944, 1963 by Harper & Row Publishers, Inc. Reprinted by permission of Harper Collins Publishers.
A. Philip Randolph, "Keynote Address to the March on Washington Movement," September 26, 1942. Reprinted by permission of Norman Hill, President, A. Philip Randolph Institute.
W. E.B. DuBois, "Behold the Land", Freedomways (First Quarter 1964), pp. 8-15. Reprinted by permission of David DuBois.
John Hope Franklin, "America's Window to the World: Her Race Problem," Address delivered at Catholic Interracial Council of New York, October 26, 1956. Reprinted by permission of John Hope Franklin.
Excerpt from Echo in My Soul by Septima Clark with LeGette Blythe. Copyright © 1962 by Septima Poinsetta Clark. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, E. P. Dutton, an imprint of New American Library, a division of Penguin Books USA, Inc.
John Henrik Clarke, "The New Afro-American Nationalism", Freedomways, Vol. 1, no. 3 (Summer 1961), pp. 285-295. Reprinted by permission of the author.
Charles Houston, "Educational Inequalities Must Go!" The Crisis, Vol. 42, no. 10 ( October 1935), pp. 300-301 and 316. Reprinted by permission of the NAACP.
Thurgood Marshall and Roy Wilkins, "Interpretation of Supreme Court Decision & the NAACP Program", The Crisis, Vol. 62, no. 6 ( June-July 1955), pp. 329-334. Reprinted by permission of the NAACP.
Elizabeth Eckford with Daisy Bates, "The First Day: Little Rock, 1957", from Growing Up Southern by Chris Mayfield. Copyright © 1976, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981 by Institute for Southern Studies. Reprinted by permission of Pantheon Books, a division of Random House.
James Meredith, Three Years in Mississippi, Indiana University Press, 1966, pp. 200-214. Reprinted by permission of the author.
Rosa Parks, "Recollections" and Franklin McCain, "Interview", from My Soul Is Rested by Howell Raines. Copyright © 1977 by Howell Raines. Reprinted by permission of the Putnam Publishing Group and by Russell & Volkening, Inc., as agents for the author.
Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It: The Memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, edited, with a foreword, by David J. Garrow. Copyright © 1987. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The University of Tennessee Press.
Excerpt from Outside the Magic Circle: The Autobiography of Virginia Foster Durr, Hollinger F. Barnard, editor. Copyright © 1985. Reprinted by permission of The University of Alabama Press.
Diane Nash, "Interview". Reprinted by permission of Diane Nash.
James Peck, Freedom Ride. Copyright © 1962. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, Simon & Schuster and by the Shaffer Agency.
Congress of Racial Equality, "All About CORE", 1963, in CORE Papers. Reprinted by permission of the Congress of Racial Equality.
Tom Hayden, "Revolution in Mississippi". Students for a Democratic Society, 1962. Reprinted by permission of Tom Hayden.
Bernice Reagon, "On Albany", from They Should Have Served That Cup of Coffee, edited by Richard Cluster. South End Press, 1979, pp. 11-31. Reprinted by permission of South End Press.

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