Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

longer than most of the male characters created during the same decade. Jenette Kahn, president of DC Comics as the century closed, describes the appeal this way: "What little girl or woman wouldn't like to be, as Wonder Woman is, admired most for her power, her values and her open heart?" (quoted in Daniels 1995, 12).


REFERENCES

Barfield Ray. Listening to Radio. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1996.

Chisholm Leslie. Guiding Youth in the Secondary School. New York: American Book Company, 1945.

Cohen Eliot E. "A Teen-age Bill of Rights." New York Times Magazine, January 7, 1945.16-17+.

Colbert David, ed. Eyewitness to America. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

Cosgrove Stuart. "The Zoot Suit and Style Warfare." In Zoot Suits and Second Hand Dresses: An Anthology of Fashion and Music, ed. Angela McRobbie. Boston: Unwin, 1988.

Couperie Pierre, and Maurice Horn. A History of the Comic Strip. New York: Crown. Publishers, 1968.

Dalzell Tom. Flappers 2 Rappers. American Youth Slang. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam Webster, 1996.

Daniels Les. Comix. A History of the Comic Book in America. New York: Outerbridge and and Dienstfrey, 1971.

_____. DC Comics. A History of the World's Favorite Comic Book Heroes. Boston: Little, Brown, 1995.

Dunning John. Tune in Yesterday. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1976.

"First-Date Quiz." Seventeen, September 1944. 4.

Forester William D. Harlan County Goes to War. Privately printed, 1990.

Gorer Geoffrey. The American People: A Study in National Character. W. W. Norton, 1948.

Graebner William. The Age of Doubt: American Thought and Culture in the 1940s. Boston: Twayne, 1991.

Hart James D. The Popular Book: A History of America's Literary Taste. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1961.

Historical Statistics of the United States Colonial Times to 1957. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of the Census, 1960.

Hollingshead August B. Elmtown's Youth. New York: John P. Wiley and Sons, 1949.

Horn Maurice. 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics. New York: Gramercy Books, 1996.

Hornsby Alton. Chronology of African-American History from 1942 to the Present. 2nd ed. Detroit, Mich.: Gale Research, 1997.

Kinsey Alfred C. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1948.

MacKenzie Catherine. "Boys, Girls, and Dates." New York Times Magazine, November 11, 1945: 29.

_____. "Unchanging Teen-agers." New York Times Magazine, December 8, 1946: 42

-145-

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Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
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