Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

Magazines and Comic Books

Seventeen continued to dominate the teen girl market in magazines; college-bound girls enjoyed Glamour and Mademoiselle as well. Although their dominant role was selling fashionable clothes, makeup, and hairstyles, these magazines always included articles about other aspects of Sixties life. Boys still had fewer general magazines devoted to them, but Mad's satiric humor kept them laughing and Playboy offered, along with its nearly-nude girls, advice about cars and sexual matters. In 1967 twenty-year-old Jann Werner began publishing Rolling Stone, the first magazine devoted to rock music and its performers; it sold well from the outset and attracted a following among older teens and young adults.

Comic books, still the staple reading of thousands of boys from age twelve to the early twenties, entered their "silver age." The super heroes from DC Comics--Batman, Superman, Green Lantern, and the Flash--continued strong, but Marvel Comics introduced their Fantastic Four, Spiderman, and the Incredible Hulk, a different kind of super hero who might sometimes appear a villain as well. In 1966 DC's Teen Titans series debuted, focusing on the "sidekicks" of the super heroes--the teen members of the crime- fighting teams. DC also appealed directly to the teen market by producing the Legion of Super Heroes, a series of comics about a teenage gang of boys and girls from other planets who had superpowers and banded together to fight greed and crime. The comics industry has always paid attention to its readers, but in 1967 DC went even further and hired thirteen-year-old Jim Shooter of Pittsburgh as a writer for the Legion of Super Heroes after he sent in an illustrated story ( Daniels 1995, 122).

Older teen boys might seek out the new "underground comics" published by small presses, which offered very different images and humor from mainstream comics. Robert Crumb was the artist most identified with them, especially his creations Fritz the Cat and Zap! Often labeled "adults only" for their ribald sexual humor, their exuberant, grotesque artwork poked fun at the counterculture while they thrived on the new freedom that made possible the market for such work.


REFERENCES

Betrock Alan. The I Was a Teenage Juvenile Delinquent Rock 'n' Roll Horror Beach Party Movie Book: A Complete Guide to the Teen Exploitation Film, 1954- 1969. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1986.

Brown Joe David, ed. The Hippies. New York: Time Incorporated, 1967.

Buck Rinker. Flight of Passage. New York: Hyperion, 1997.

Chadwick Bruce A., and Jim B. Heaton. Statistical Handbook on the American Family. Phoenix, Ariz.: Oryx, 1992.

_____. Statistical Handbook on Adolescents in America. Phoenix, Ariz.: Oryx, 1996.

Colbert David, ed. Eyewitness to America. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

-238-

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Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
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