Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

but less experienced readers were upset when national news media featured the story: "Superman's death was in every paper and magazine, on every news broadcast, and included as part of every comedian's monologue" ( Daniels 1995, 218). The public seemed to lose something vital, as it had when Robin was killed in the Eighties. Six million copies of the comic book were sold. Of course, he came back, more muscular and tousled than ever, in October 1993.

Devoted readers of comic books still love the X-Men series, debuted by Marvel in the Sixties and revitalized in the Nineties. Marvel, too, has led the way in stories featuring black super heroes, beginning in the Seventies. The early Nineties showed an increase in such characters; Brotherman, Ebony Warrior, Horus, Meteor Man, Shadowhawk, Sustahgirl, and Night Thrasher are a few. These super heroes have grown more complex in their kinds of powers, in their employment, and in their interactions with families ( Davenport 1997, 27). Unfortunately, they may also be disappearing because many independent comics producers have been bought out. The "commitment of comic book publishers to diversity was and is of secondary importance" to economics ( 1997, 27), and such characters will have to appeal to a wider audience with solid storylines and artwork if they are to survive. DC's Milestone series has tried to create such audiences through an increasing pool of multicultural artists and writers.


REFERENCES

Ash Peter, et al. "Gun Acquisition and Use by Juvenile Offenders". Journal of the American Medical Association 275, no. 22 ( June 12, 1996): 1754+.

Bertin Joan E. "Do Teenage Girl Magazines Belong on Middle School Library Shelves?" Newsday, March 1, 1998, B7.

Biondo Brenda. "Quick Climb to the Top." USA Weekend, February 13-15, 1998, 8.

Birdseye Debbie, and Tom Birdseye. Under Our Skin: Kids Talk about Race. Photographs by Robert Crum. New York: Holiday House, 1997.

Brumberg Joan Jacobs. The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls. New York: Random House, 1997.

Campbell Patty. "The Sand in the Oyster." Horn Book Magazine 70, no. 2 ( March/ April 1994): 234-38.

Chadwick Bruce A., and Jim B. Heaton. Statistical Handbook on Adolescents in America. Phoenix, Ariz.: Oryx, 1996.

Cloud John. "Out, Proud, and Very Young." Time, December 8, 1997, 82-83.

Colbert David, ed. "The Quilt." In Eyewitness to America, 559-562. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

Coontz Stephanie. The Way We Never Were: North American Families and the Nostalgia Trap. New York: Basic Books, 1992.

Corliss Richard. "Bart Simpson." Time, June 8, 1998, 204-5.

-----. "The Class of '98." Time, August 3, 1998, 66-68.

Dalzell Tom. Flappers 2 Rappers. American Youth Slang. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster, 1996.

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Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
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