Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide

By Lucy Rollin | Go to book overview

Appendix: A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web

The rapidity with which the Internet continues to grow may make this sampling outdated quickly. These sites are offered here as examples only; they make up only a tiny percentage of the available sites, both serious and frivolous, for teens.


SCHOOL AND WORK
http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/women/ Discusses women at the National Areo-
nautics and Space Administration; aimed
at an audience of teen girls
http://www.finaid.org/ Helps teens seeking funding for college
http://www.CollegeEdge.com/ A college rating system
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/ College ratings by U.S. News and World
edu/Report
http://www.petersons.com./ugrad/ Peterson's guide to undergraduate insti-
tutions
http://www.bellsouth.net/dp/educ/ Bellsouth's comprehensive resource for
teens, on almost all subjects related to
school
http://www.homeworkhelp.com/ Comprehensive homework help for a
yahoo_____index.htm small fee
http://wwwfuturescan.com/ Details about jobs and beginning careers

-367-

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Twentieth-Century Teen Culture by the Decades: A Reference Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Early Decades, 1900-1920 1
  • References 30
  • 2 - The 1920s 33
  • References 65
  • 3 - The 1930s 67
  • References 100
  • 4 - The 1940s 103
  • References 145
  • 5 - The 1950s 147
  • References 195
  • 6 - The 1960s 197
  • References 238
  • 7 - The 1970s 241
  • References 268
  • 8 - The 1980s 271
  • References 305
  • 9 - The 1990s 309
  • References 357
  • A Note on Statistics 361
  • A Note on Sources 363
  • Appendix - A Sample of. Teen-Oriented Links, to the World Wide Web 367
  • Index 371
  • About the Author 397
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