Show Trials: Stalinist Purges in Eastern Europe, 1948-1954

By George H. Hodos | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE
1.
Koestler, Arthur, Darkness at Noon, New York, 1961,pp.78-79.
2.
Darkness, pp. 161-162.
3.
Darkness, p. 175.
4.
Darkness, p. 75.

INTRODUCTION
1
Yugoslavia, the initial target of the Stalinist purges, is excluded from this book. Tito's purges of the "Cominformists" (communists who sided with Stalin or merely disagreed with the break) belong to a different category, as genuine and not imaginery, fabricated opponents were hounded and imprisoned. That does not mean, however, that the Yugoslav purges were either more humane or more just than those of Stalin. The two prominent victims, Politburo members Hebrang and Žujović, were jailed shortly before the conflict broke into the open. Hebrang committed suicide in the prison, Žujović stayed for two and a half years in solitary confinement and was released in September 1950 after recanting his pro-Soviet views (in 1966, he was even readmitted to the party). From 1948 until its dissolution in 1962, about 12,000 "Cominformists" were sent to the infamous internment camp of Goli Otok, an uninhabited, inaccessible island in the northern Adriatic, many of them for merely dropping critical remarks in private conversations, for reading illegal leaflets, or for listening to the shortwave radio. They were beaten, put to hard labor, and had no visitation rights, and many died of the extremely cruel treatment. Thousands escaped internment but were fired from their jobs, families were disrupted as pressure was put on wives to divorce their "traitor" husbands. See Djilas M., Rise and Fall, New York, 1983, pp. 235-245.
2
As an arbitrary choice, see Ambrose S., Rise to Globalism, New York, 1980; it offers a concise outline of the escalating East-West antagonism.
3
National Security Council directive NSC 10/2 of May 1948.
4
For covert operations in Western Europe, see Barnet R., The Alliance, New York, 1983, pp. 140-143. For covert operations in Eastern Europe, see Powers T., The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA, New York, 1979, pp. 46-50. For a detailed account of the Albanian operation, see Bethell N., The Great Betrayal, London, 1984.
5
Medvedev R., On Stalin and Stalinism, New York, 1949, pp. 153, 157. Mikoyan

-165-

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Show Trials: Stalinist Purges in Eastern Europe, 1948-1954
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - INTRODUCTION 1
  • Chapter 2 - PRELUDE IN ALBANIA 5
  • Chapter 3 - THE KOSTOV TRIAL IN BULGARIA 13
  • Chapter 4 - THE FIELD CONNECTION 25
  • Chapter 5 - THE ROAD TO THE RAJK TRIAL 33
  • Chapter 6 - PREPARATIONS FOR THE MODEL TRIAL 43
  • Chapter 7 - THE RAJK TRIAL 59
  • Chapter 8 - THE UNLEASHED TERROR IN PRAGUE 73
  • Chapter 9 - THE SLÁNSKÝ TRIAL 83
  • Chapter 10 - THE REINTERPRETED SHOW TRIALS IN ROMANIA 93
  • Chapter 11 - THE INTERRUPTED SHOW TRIALS IN EAST GERMANY 113
  • Chapter 12 - THE POLISH WAY OF SHOW TRIALS 135
  • Chapter 13 - CONSEQUENCES AND CONCLUSIONS 159
  • Notes 165
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 179
  • Index 183
  • About the Author 195
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