Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide

By Barbara Ruth Peltzman | Go to book overview

Robert Owen (1771-1858)
On his monument in a London cemetery the words "He Originated And Founded Infant Schools" commemorate Owen's work. Owen's other contributions include raising the working age in his mill from six years to ten years and providing improved housing, better working conditions, and a company store that charged less than other shops for workers. In 1816 he established a school for children and adults in the mill in New Lanark, Scotland, called the Institute for the Formation of Character, which included an Infant School for children ages 3 through 6. Owen believed in the importance of the early childhood years. The school provided humane treatment for pupils by avoiding physical punishment; instruction aimed at the formation of good habits and kindness to others; play, outdoor activities, hands-on instruction, and field trips; and classes in reading, writing, arithmetic, writing, sewing, music, dance, geography, natural history, and modern and ancient history. Children were taught only what they could understand and were not forced to attend to lessons. Owen's desire for social reform through model communities emphasized the education of children to deal with the new social order. The concept of Infant Schools spread to America and even though the movement was short-lived, it set the stage for future educational reforms. Infant Schools provided humane education and child care for working mothers.
PRIMARY SOURCES
329. Owen Robert Dale. Outline of the System of Education at New Lanark. Glasgow: Wardlaw and Cunningham, 1824. Owen's son describes the education plan in detail for children in the mill town of New Lanark. Robert became his father's chief interpreter of educational ideas.
330. "Essay on the Formation of Character". In The Life of Robert Owen by Himself Vol. 1. London: Effingham Wilson, 1857. Owen's educational philosophy and plan in his own words.
331. The Life of Robert Owen by Himself. 2 vols. London: Effingham Wilson, 1857- 1858. Autobiography presenting Owen's political, social, and educational philosophies. Has reprints of Owen's writings until 1820 in the appendix.
332. Owen Robert Dale. Threading My Way: Twenty-Seven Years Autobiography. New York: G.W. Carleton, 1874. The life of Owen's son with excellent original documents about New Harmony, the New Hampshire community based on New Lanark.

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Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Bibliography xvi
  • Johann Amos Comenius (1592-1670) 1
  • John Dewey (1859-1952) 3
  • Ella Victoria Dobbs (1866-1952) 17
  • Abigail Adams Eliot (1892-1992) 21
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Froebel (1782-1852) 25
  • Arnold Lucius Gesell (1880-1961) 29
  • William Nicholas Hailmann (1836-1920) 33
  • Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) 41
  • William Torrey Harris (1835-1908) and Susan E. Blow (1843-1916) 47
  • Elizabeth Harrison (1849-1927) 55
  • Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) 59
  • Amy M. Hostler (1898-1987) 63
  • Leland B. Jacobs (1907-1992) 65
  • William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965) 67
  • Lucy Craft Laney (1854-1933) 71
  • John Locke (1632-1704) 73
  • Emma Jacobina Christiana Marwedel (1818-1893) 75
  • Margaret Mcmillan (1860-1931) and Rachel Mcmillan (1859-1917) 77
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell (1878-1967) 79
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 83
  • Robert Owen (1771-1858) 85
  • Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-1894) 87
  • Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) 91
  • Jean Piaget (1896-1980) 93
  • Caroline Pratt (1867-1954) 99
  • Alice Harvey Whiting Putnam (1841-1919) 101
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) 105
  • Alice Temple (1871-1946) 107
  • Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) and the National Association of Colored Women 111
  • Edward Lee Thorndike (1874-1949) 117
  • Evangeline H. Ward (1920-1985) 121
  • Lillian Weber (1917-1994) 125
  • Lucy Wheelock (1857-1946) 129
  • Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) 133
  • Appendix - A Chronological List 135
  • Bibliography 137
  • Index 139
  • About the Author *
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