Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide

By Barbara Ruth Peltzman | Go to book overview

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827)
A belief that the best school for young children was similar to a firm, loving family led Pestalozzi to develop a new method of instruction that emphasized educational experiences based on emotional stability and warmth to foster self-development and positive moral growth.Pestalozzi believed in individual differences and in extending educational opportunity to girls and the poor based on a belief that education should not be denied to anyone. His conviction that children should engage in activities that make them happy and his commitment to firsthand, positive experiences led to an emphasis on proceeding from the concrete to the abstract and from the general to the particular to fit instruction to the way children develop. He used real objects and object lessons to help children discover language, concepts, and numbers based on children's activities.Sympathy and compassion were the foundation of Pestalozzi's method. Many visitors, including Friedrich Froebel, came to his school to observe his innovative way of teaching young children
PRIMARY SOURCES
353.Die a Bendstude Eines Einsiedlers, bearbeitet und mit Erlauterungen versehen von Karl Richter Leipzig: Padagogische Bibliothek, 1818. [ The Evening Hour of A Hermit]. An attempt to analyze and justify his educational ideas after his failed experimental school called Neuhof, which was a working farm where students did household and farm work. Considering himself a failure as an educator, Pestalozzi writes about his experience in a flash of insight. This is a lesser known work than his Leonard and Gertrude, but is well worth reading.
354. How Gertrude Teaches Her Children. Trans. Lucy Halland and Francis Turner and ed. by Ebenezer Cooke. London: Allen & Unwin, 1894. (repr.) Syracuse: C.W. Bardeen, 1915. This work of fiction describes Pestalozzi's systematic method in which observation results in greater awareness, which results in speech and academic skills. It explores the ways in which a mother can help her children learn to count and read using daily activities such as household tasks, weaving, and spinning. Sequel to Leonard and Gertrude.
355. Sammtliche WerkeGesichtet (edited) von L. W. Seyffarth. 12 vol. Liegnitz: Habel, 1899- 1902. [The complete works of Pestalozzi edited by L. W. Seyffarth ] The complete writings in German.

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Pioneers of Early Childhood Education: A Bio-Bibliographical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Bibliography xvi
  • Johann Amos Comenius (1592-1670) 1
  • John Dewey (1859-1952) 3
  • Ella Victoria Dobbs (1866-1952) 17
  • Abigail Adams Eliot (1892-1992) 21
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Froebel (1782-1852) 25
  • Arnold Lucius Gesell (1880-1961) 29
  • William Nicholas Hailmann (1836-1920) 33
  • Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) 41
  • William Torrey Harris (1835-1908) and Susan E. Blow (1843-1916) 47
  • Elizabeth Harrison (1849-1927) 55
  • Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) 59
  • Amy M. Hostler (1898-1987) 63
  • Leland B. Jacobs (1907-1992) 65
  • William Heard Kilpatrick (1871-1965) 67
  • Lucy Craft Laney (1854-1933) 71
  • John Locke (1632-1704) 73
  • Emma Jacobina Christiana Marwedel (1818-1893) 75
  • Margaret Mcmillan (1860-1931) and Rachel Mcmillan (1859-1917) 77
  • Lucy Sprague Mitchell (1878-1967) 79
  • Maria Montessori (1870-1952) 83
  • Robert Owen (1771-1858) 85
  • Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-1894) 87
  • Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) 91
  • Jean Piaget (1896-1980) 93
  • Caroline Pratt (1867-1954) 99
  • Alice Harvey Whiting Putnam (1841-1919) 101
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) 105
  • Alice Temple (1871-1946) 107
  • Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) and the National Association of Colored Women 111
  • Edward Lee Thorndike (1874-1949) 117
  • Evangeline H. Ward (1920-1985) 121
  • Lillian Weber (1917-1994) 125
  • Lucy Wheelock (1857-1946) 129
  • Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) 133
  • Appendix - A Chronological List 135
  • Bibliography 137
  • Index 139
  • About the Author *
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