Presidential Influence and Environmental Policy

By Robert A. Shanley; Bernard K. Johnpoll | Go to book overview

Watt to change OSM regulations and the structure of the agency. Other polarizing factors included congressional oversight activity, the extensive litigation and difficulties in complying with court settlements, the Reagan administrative presidency tactics and deregulation strategy, and the Administration's unwillingness to provide the agency with additional resources to fulfill its statutory mission and the requirements of court orders. Apart from the environmental implications of this polarization and political impasse, its net effect was a serious loss of the morale, competency, and legitimacy of the agency and its functional responsibilities.


NOTES
1.
Albert Reiss Jr., "Selecting Strategies of Social Control over Organizational Life," in Enforcing Regulation, ed. Keith Hawkins and John M. Thomas ( Boston, Mass.: Nijhoff, 1983), 23-25.
2.
Eugene Bardach and Robert A. Kagan, Going by the Book: The Problems of Regulating Reasonableness ( Philadelphia, Penn.: Temple University Press, 1982), 207-8.
3.
U.S. Congressional Budget Office, The Environmental Protection Agency: Overview of the Proposed 1984 Budget, 1984, 3.
4.
George C. Eads and Michael Fix, Relief or Reform: Reagan's Regulatory Dilemma ( Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press, 1984), 194.
5.
Testimony of Senator Patrick J. Leahy, EPA Oversight: One-Year Review, Joint Hearings, House of Representatives, 97th Cong., 2d sess., 21 July 1982, 39.
6.
B. Dan Wood, "Principals, Bureaucrats, and Responsiveness in Clean Air Enforcements," American Political Science Review 82 ( March 1988): 218-19.
7.
Clifford Russell, Winston Harrington, and William J. Vaughan, Enforcing Pollution Control Laws ( Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future, 1986), 219.
8.
GAO, Waste Water Dischargers Are Not Complying with EPA Pollution Control Permits, RCED- 84-53, 2 December 1983.
9.
EPA's Office of Research and Development and Related Issues. Hearing, Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, 98th Cong., 2d sess., 14 March 1984, 106.
10.
Office of Public Affairs, EPA, Environmental News, 16 December 1986, 3.
11.
Summary of Enforcement Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 1986; EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Monitoring, April 1987; Summary of Enforcement Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 1985; EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Monitoring, Washington, D.C., April 1986.
12.
David B. Walker, "The Condition and Course of the System," in Administering the New Federalism, ed. Lewis G. Bender and James A. Stever ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1986), 333-34.
13.
Timothy J. Conlan, "Ambivalent Federalism: Intergovernmental Policy in the Reagan Administration," in Administering the New Federalism, 16.
14.
Michael Fix, "Transferring Regulatory Authority to the States," in The Reagan Regulatory Strategy: An Assessment, ed. George C. Eads and Michael Fix ( Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press, 1984), 158-59.

-127-

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Presidential Influence and Environmental Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 7
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - The Administrative Presidency: Information Collection, Statistical Policy, and Environmental Policy 27
  • Notes 46
  • 3 - Presidential Executive Orders and Environmental Policy 49
  • Notes 84
  • 4 - The Administrative Presidency and the Politics of Risk Management 91
  • Notes 106
  • 5 - The Reagan Administrative Presidency Strategy and the Politics of Enforcement in Environmental Policy 109
  • Notes 127
  • 6 - The Bush Presidency and Environmental Policy 131
  • Notes 151
  • 7 - Conclusion 155
  • Notes 163
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 183
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