Presidential Influence and Environmental Policy

By Robert A. Shanley; Bernard K. Johnpoll | Go to book overview

mental and natural resources losses. The major challenges of the 1990s and the next century require major reconsideration by Congress and the presidency of the institutional capability and reform of the regulatory system to cope with interrelated national and global environmental problems.

Unfortunately, limits on political incentives of the president as administrative and legislative leader in environmental policy render such leadership problematic and uncertain for the ma or challenges the nation faces in the foreseeable future.


NOTES
1.
Gerald M. Pomper, "The Presidential Election," in The Election of 1980: Reports and Interpretations, ed. Gerald M. Pomper with colleagues (Chatham, NJ.: Chatham House Publishers, 1981), 86-87. See also Michael E. Kraft, "A New Environmental Policy Agenda: The 1980 Presidential Campaign and Its Aftermath," in Environmental Policy in the 1980s: Reagan's New Agenda, ed. Norman J. Vig and Michael E. Kraft ( Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 1984), 43-44.
2.
Michael D. Reagan, "The Reagan 'Mandate,' Public Law and the Politics of Change," Congress and the Presidency 12 (Autumn 1985): 187.
3.
Riley E. Dunlap, "Public Opinion and Environmental Protection," in Enviromental Politics and Policy, ed. James P. Lester ( Durham, N.C.: Duke University, 1989), 114-16.
4.
Terry M. Moe, "The Politicized Presidency," in New Directions in American Politics, ed. John E. Chubb and Paul E. Petersen ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1985), 246.
5.
Joel Aberbach and Bert Rockman, "Mandates or Mandarins? Control and Discretion in the Modern Administrative State," Public Administration Review 48 (March/ April 1988): 608.
6.
Richard W. Waterman, Presidential Influence and the Administrative State ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1990): 13, 192.
7.
Aberbach and Rockman, "Mandates or Mandarins,"609.
8.
Michael Waldron, "Deep Freeze the Regulatory Freeze," The New York Times, 2 February 1992, F, 13.
9.
Holly Brough, "Nature's Classroom," World Watch 4 (May/ June 1991): 8.
10.
Norman J. Vig, "Presidential Leadership from the Reagan to the Bush Administration," in Environmental Policy in the 1990s: Toward a New Agenda, ed. Norman J. Vig and Michael E. Kraft ( Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 1991): 45-47.
11.
Riley E. Dunlop, "Public Opinion and Environmental Policies," in Environmental Politics, 133-34.
12.
Herman E. Daly and John Cobb Jr., For the Common Good: Redirecting the Economy toward Community, the Environment and a Sustainable Future ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1989), 62.
13.
Sandra Postal, "Toward a New 'Eco-nomics,'" World Watch 3 (September/ October 1990): 25; Robert Repetto and William B. Magrath, Wasting Assets: Natural Resources in the National Income Accounts ( Washington, D.C.: World Resources Institute, 1989), 1-2.

-163-

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