In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger

By Paul Chwialkowski | Go to book overview

2
FORMATION OF A PERSONALITY

Robert Eichelberger entered West Point in June 1905. His first year was difficult emotionally, for he had to deal with the problems of a new environment as well as a rigorous academic program. His confidence was hindered by his father, who continued to express reservations about his abilities. George wrote that "you will find your chief difficulty in mathematics," and "one thing will help you though and that is [that] you do not apparently feel too much overconfidence . . . with your studies." George concluded that "if you don't [pass the studies] and come back we will be much happier than to have you away, for it is very lonesome for us . . . and I have looked forward to having you, the youngest, with us all the time until the end."1

Torn by the demands of school and home, Robert also suffered under the harshness of West Point life. He complained that the barracks were always cold and that he never got enough sleep. He was frequently ill with colds, tonsillitis, and flu. His life was made miserable by the upperclassmen, who chose the naive Ohio farmboy as the object of their pranks and hazing. Enraged by this ill-treatment, Robert was advised by his father to "ignore it," but "if any fellow makes himself too obnoxious give him an upper punch under the jaw." 2

Robert's social problems were trivial in comparison to his academic difficulties. Unused to prolonged study and not interested in learning for pleasure, he quickly fell behind in his schoolwork and had difficulty in maintaining passing grades. As an excuse for his poor marks, he blamed his roommates, Wentworth Moss and William Mathues (both were football players who later flunked out of West Point). Eichelberger claimed that they would frequently take the books out of his hands and throw them on the floor and chastise him for "boning files on your classmates." Robert admitted, however, that he was usually more than happy to "surrender" his books, and that his interest in football and other diversions took precedence over his academic work. 3

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.