In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger

By Paul Chwialkowski | Go to book overview

4
PATHS TO PROMOTION

After Siberia, Eichelberger was assigned to the Philippine Department in Manila as Assistant Chief of Staff and Chief of Intelligence. His duties in Manila were the same as his duties in Siberia: to observe and report on Japanese activities in the Far East. He prepared a monograph on China and recommended that the United States prepare contingency plans for a possible war against Japan. For the most part, his new assignment was a relaxing change from the tense days in Siberia; he enjoyed a comfortable home with large, well-ventilated rooms, and every afternoon he played golf with his fellow officers on a public course outside of Manila. 1

He was not totally satisfied with his new assignment. He stated that "it is a little difficult to understand now why" he "should have been ordered to the tropics after leaving Siberia after spending nearly two years there in war time." He added, "I cannot imagine worse torture than to be thrown into the tropics after a Siberian winter wearing heavy woolen uniforms." He was upset that Colonel Ralph H. Van Deman, a "fair-haired boy" from France, had plotted to take his place as the chief U.S. intelligence officer in the Philippines. Van Deman's friends successfully revoked Eichelberger's orders to Manila, and would have kept him from his new job if it were not for the intervention of General Peyton March, the Chief of Staff. Eichelberger noted that March "was not too friendly with the European group and had my orders reissued." 2

Eichelberger was also unhappy that he had been reduced in rank from Lieutenant Colonel (temporary) to Major (permanent) on 1 July 1920. He bemoaned the loss of his wartime rank and complained that the intelligence work in Manila was "not as vitally interesting as the work" in Siberia. "In many ways I was sorry to leave Siberia," he stated, for "the work there . . . was more interesting than I am liable to get in the future in the army." 3

His concerns about his future duties were ill-founded. In October 1920, he was ordered to China to establish intelligence offices in Peking and Tientsin.

-29-

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In Caesar's Shadow: The Life of General Robert Eichelberger
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note x
  • 1 - ORIGINS OF A MILITARY CAREER 1
  • Notes 5
  • 2 - FORMATION OF A PERSONALITY 7
  • Notes 13
  • 3 - SIBERIA -- A PERSONALITY EMERGES 15
  • Notes 25
  • 4 - PATHS TO PROMOTION 29
  • Notes 39
  • 5 - PREPARATION FOR WARTIME COMMAND 43
  • Notes 54
  • 6 - BUNA -- THE PYRRHIC VICTORY 57
  • Notes 75
  • 7 - STRUGGLES FROM THE SIDELINES 81
  • Notes 91
  • 8 - HOLLANDIA AND BIAK -- VICTORY AND CONFLICT 95
  • Notes 105
  • 9 - THE PHILIPPINES -- COMPETITION WITH KRUEGER 109
  • Notes 124
  • 10 - VICTORY AND DISAPPOINTMENT 131
  • Notes 142
  • 11 - MILITARY OCCUPATION OF JAPAN 149
  • Notes 162
  • 12 - RETIREMENT -- AND TURMOIL 173
  • Notes 190
  • Conclusion 205
  • Notes 208
  • SOURCES 209
  • Index 221
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