Ranks and Columns: Armed Forces Newspapers in American Wars

By Alfred Emile Cornebise | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The preparation of this study involved numerous people and organizations. Among those that the author wishes to acknowledge are members of the staff at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in Madison, especially James P. Danky and David Myers, who guided me through the excellent extensive Walter S. and Ester Dougherty Newspaper Collection there. At the U.S. Army Military History Institute, at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, as always, Richard J. Sommers, John J. Slonaker, and David A. Keough, guided my researches, giving unstintingly of their time and expertise. Agnes F. Peterson, Linda Wheeler, and Helen Pashin were always ready to assist me at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace in Palo Alto, California. Col. Robert N. Waggoner, at the U.S. Army's Center of Military History in Washington, D.C., provided me with useful information. Randi J. Vachon, at the Office of the Secretary of the Army at the Pentagon provided me with valuable contacts. Charles A. Shaughnessy, at the National Archives; Wendy A. Whitfield, at the library, the United States Military Academy; Alissa Wiener, at the Minnesota Historical Society; Miriam Touba, at the New-York Historical Society; Andrew D. Chalfen, with The Historical Society of Pennsylvania; Victoria L. Jaeger, at the newspaper library, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Frances S. Pollard, with the Virginia Historical Society; and Nanci Holli, head librarian, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, all drew upon their respective sources to assist me in locating often obscure materials. Lacy W. Dick and Teresa Roane, on short notice, came to my aid one rainy afternoon in Richmond, Virginia, at the Valentine Museum, in locating numerous Civil War troop papers. Similar services for other sources were provided by the staff of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York. As so often in the past, Lucy Schweers and the staff at the Inter-Library Loan Office, the James A. Michener Library on the campus

-xi-

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Ranks and Columns: Armed Forces Newspapers in American Wars
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Beginnings: The Revolutionary War and Beyond 1
  • 2 - The Mexican War: 1846-1848 7
  • 3 - Civil War Soldier Papers 23
  • 4 - The Maturing of the Military Press, 1865-1917 51
  • 5 - World War I: Ground Forces Papers 65
  • 6 - World War I: Air Service Papers 101
  • 7 - World War Ii: The Early Years 111
  • 8 - World War Ii: The Later Years and Beyond 135
  • 9 - After World War II 159
  • Notes 169
  • Selected Bibliography 193
  • Index 199
  • About the Author 219
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