Ranks and Columns: Armed Forces Newspapers in American Wars

By Alfred Emile Cornebise | Go to book overview

2 The Mexican War: 1846-1848

They carry about with them their Homers, Xenophones and Thucydides in the shape of some printers and editors, who, as soon as the fighting subsides, throw aside their muskets, and hunt up a few reams of paper.

-- New Orleans Delta, November 20, 1847.

The war with Mexico emerged from America's preoccupation with Manifest Destiny: a drive to expand, especially toward the southwest and west. The war's causes therefore centered on California, New Mexico, and Texas.1 When Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836, American interest and involvement increased, and Texans hoped for early incorporation by the United States. However, this raised the spectre of war with Mexico and the Americans proceeded slowly. At length, on March 1, 1845, President John Tyler signed a joint resolution of Congress to annex Texas, and when, on July 4, a state convention ratified Washington's offer, Texas entered the Union on December 29, 1845. These developments, together with the plans of the new president, John Knox Polk, to obtain California and New Mexico, initiated the conflict with Mexico. On March 6, 1845, the Mexican ambassador broke off relations and left for his capital to protest the proposed annexation of Texas. Prolonged efforts to negotiate failed, and when General Zachary Taylor arrived with U.S. troops at Corpus Christi on July 25, tensions mounted. When Taylor was ordered further south to Matamoros, where he appeared on March 28, 1846, the Mexicans attacked a U.S. cavalry patrol near Brownsville on April 25, resulting in many American casualties. The Americans responded with alacrity, winning victories over the Mexicans at the Battle of Palo Alto on May 8, and at Resaca de la Palma on the following day. With a state of war now existing between the United States

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Ranks and Columns: Armed Forces Newspapers in American Wars
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Beginnings: The Revolutionary War and Beyond 1
  • 2 - The Mexican War: 1846-1848 7
  • 3 - Civil War Soldier Papers 23
  • 4 - The Maturing of the Military Press, 1865-1917 51
  • 5 - World War I: Ground Forces Papers 65
  • 6 - World War I: Air Service Papers 101
  • 7 - World War Ii: The Early Years 111
  • 8 - World War Ii: The Later Years and Beyond 135
  • 9 - After World War II 159
  • Notes 169
  • Selected Bibliography 193
  • Index 199
  • About the Author 219
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