Racism, Dissent, and Asian Americans from 1850 to the Present: A Documentary History

By Philip S. Foner; Daniel Rosenberg | Go to book overview

Part VI: Relocation and Protest

Examples follow of the legal rationale for the evacuation of the Japanese during World War II, accounts of the internment, and statements by or about people -- generally not of Japanese descent -- who opposed the government's concentration camp policy. The materials also trace the struggle by camp survivors for vindication and reparations.

Executive Order 9066 introduces the argument justifying relocation [Document 1]. 1 General DeWitt, commander of the West Coast Command, gives the military rationale for evacuation [Document 2]. Excerpts from a wartime Congressional investigation charge relocation officials with failing to elicit proper displays of loyalty from internees [Document 3]. Confirmation of the bad taste left by the use and potential re-employment of concentration camps (the latter made possible under the Internal Security Act of 1950) is suggested in the Kleindienst letter of 1969 [Document 4].

Organized resistance to evacuation, including legal action, began in the Japanese American community, accompanied by efforts to improve conditions and treatment under internment. Landmark dissents in the Supreme Court challenged the hysteria of the period [Document 5]. An account of the internment experience constitutes Document 6. The internment of Karl Yoneda and the position of the Communist Party are the concerns of Documents 7 and 8. Socialist and civil libertarian Norman Thomas was an outspoken opponent of the relocation [Document 9]. So too was the editor and writer Carey McWilliams, a foremost commentator on racism, labor and the rights of Asian Americans [Documents 10 and 11].

Quaker George Knox Roth worked doggedly in Los Angeles against the evacuation; he paid a heavy price [Document 12]. The endeavors of the Methodist pastor Herbert V. Nicholson, an early proponent of federal reparations for the survivors, are sketched in Document 13. The Pittsburgh Courier, a leading African- American paper, reported favorably on a Japanese American's vision of cooperation against racism [Document 14]. The Black scholar and leader W.E.B. DuBois spoke out insistently against the

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Racism, Dissent, and Asian Americans from 1850 to the Present: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Law and Dissent 17
  • Part II - Statements by Public Figures and Organizations 75
  • Part III - The Views of the Clergy 131
  • Part IV - The Labor Movement 165
  • Part V - African-Americans 209
  • Part VI - Relocation and Protest 247
  • Select Bibliography 303
  • Index 309
  • About the Editors *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.