The Critical Response to Andy Warhol

By Alan R. Pratt | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY

In the 1960s, Andy Warhol was one of the most famous artists in the world, and by the time he died in 1987, he had churned out an enormous body of work. His commercial production, drawings, paintings, sculpture, portraits, photographs, the thousands and thousands of mechanically reproduced images, his books (more than twenty), and hundreds of films make him one of the most prolific artists of the century.

1928 6 August, born Andrew Warhola in Pittsburgh, PA, to Andrej (Andrew) Warhola and Julia Zavacsky. His father immigrated to the United Stated from Czechoslovakia in 1913; mother followed in 1921. Brothers: Paul (born 1922) and John (born 1925). Father works in construction, later as a coal miner in West Virginia.

1936-37 Has a "nervous breakdown" (Saint Vitus's dance).

1942 Father dies 15 May after a three-year illness (tuberculous peritonitis).

1945 Graduates from Schenley High School, Pittsburgh.

1945-49 Attends Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh. Meets Philip Pearlstein, a fellow student. Teaches art part-time at Irene Kaufman Settlement and during the summers works as a window decorator for Joseph Horne department store.

1947 Art editor of the student magazine.

1949 Graduates with a B.F.A. Moves to New York City and briefly shares apartment with Pearlstein. Begins using the name Warhol. Meets Tina Fredericks,

-xxix-

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The Critical Response to Andy Warhol
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Notes xxv
  • CHRONOLOGY xxix
  • 1 - The Nineteen Sixties 1
  • 2 - The Nineteen Seventies 59
  • Notes 60
  • Notes 73
  • 3 The Nineteen Eighties 123
  • Notes 132
  • Notes 158
  • Notes 186
  • 4 - The Nineteen Nineties 239
  • Notes 247
  • Works Cited 248
  • Notes 259
  • Notes 265
  • Works Cited 267
  • Note 274
  • Works Cited 274
  • Notes 286
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 291
  • Index 297
  • About the Editor *
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