The Critical Response to Andy Warhol

By Alan R. Pratt | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
See B. Rose, Oldenburg, Greenwich, CT, 1970, Pt. 1.
2.
For the first view see H. Smagula, Currents: Contemporary Directions in the Visual Arts, Englewood Cliffs, 1983, 41-52; D. Lurrie, "Andy Warhol/Disaster Paintings", Arts Magazine, Summer 1986, 117-118; and A. Huyssen, "The Cultural Politics of Pop", After the Great Divide, Bloomington, 1986, 141-148. For the second view, see C. Tomkins, "Raggedy Andy", The Scene: Reports on Post-Modern Art, New York, 1976, 35-53. Some critics and historians have insisted that his earliest Pop art was critical but that he very quickly (and mysteriously) relinquished that agenda for a more selfish one. See, for example: T. Crow, "Saturday Disasters: Trace and Reference in Early Warhol", Art in America, May 1987, 129-136 and R. Hughes, "The Rise of Andy Warhol", New York Review, Feb. 18, 1982, 6-10.
3.
An exception is P. Smith, Andy Warhol's Art and Film, Ann Arbor, 1986.
4.
Warhol's closest friend in the 1950s, Charles Lisanby, insisted that he was both "sweet and gentle." In Ibid., 380. Eugene Moore, for whom Warhol designed window displays at Bonwit Teller, agreed: ". . . he always seemed so nice and uncomplicated. He had a sweet, fey, little-boy quality, which he used, but it was pleasant even so . . ." In Tomkins (as in n. 2), 39.
5.
Smith (as in n. 3), 260 and 317-318.
6.
P. Tyler, "Andy Warhol", Art News, Dec. 1956, 59.
7.
Conversation with Pearlstein 7 March 1987 in Tallahassee, FL.
8.
Ted Carey, the friend who promoted Warhol's interest in collecting contemporary art, said that " Andy was definitely influenced by Johns and Rauschenberg, not so much by their produced work but by . . . their success and their glamour and the fact that they were in the Castelli Gallery . . . that they were 'stars' . . ." In Smith (as in n. 3), 263. Another friend, Emile de Antonio, recalled Warhol's wistful comment, " Jasper is such a star." In Tomkins (as in n. 2), 44. Warhol continued doing commercial work until about 1964 when the sales of his art permitted him to quit it, but he understood that knowledge of it would hurt his reputation as a legitimate artist and so he kept the fact from his dealers and art fiends. A. Warhol and P. Hackett, Popism: The Warhol '60s, New York, 1980, 17.

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