The Critical Response to Andy Warhol

By Alan R. Pratt | Go to book overview
2.
These three periods, incidentally, recapitulate the history of filmmaking in general as the films progress from unscripted, silent black and white shorts to elaborate, full-length commercial features, and Warhol himself moves from photographer, to director, to producer ( Arthur149).
3.
Warhol insisted that many of the films be projected at 16 frames-per-second, resulting in a barely perceptible slow motion ( Mussman154).
4.
David James identifies a threefold process in Warhol's appropriation of the Hollywood experience. They include 1) a selective use of names, roles and gestures from Hollywood's golden age, 2) deliberately crude generic imitations, and 3) remakes of specific films (141).
5.
Tony Rayns specifically addresses the Morrissey/ Warhol relationship in his essay, "Death at Work"; and though he does not answer the question of why the two " collaborated," his profile of Morrissey and his films illuminates the sharp differences between Warhol and his assistant.

WORKS CITED

Arthur Paul. "Flesh of Absence" in Andy Warhol: Film Factory. Ed. Michael O'Pray. London: British Film Institute, 1989, 146-153.

Battcock Gregory. "Four Films by Andy Warhol" in The New American Cinema. Ed. Gregory Battcock. E. P. Dutton, 1967, 233-252.

Berg Gretchen. "Nothing to Lose: An Interview with Andy Warhol". Cahiers du Cinema in English, no. 10, 1967. Rpt. in Andy Warhol: Film Factory. Ed. Michael O'Pray. London: British Film Institute, 1989, 54-61.

Bragin John. "The Work of Bruce Baillie" in The New American Cinema. Ed. Gregory Battcock . New York: E. P. Dutton, 1967, 226-232.

Bourdon David. "Warhol as Film Maker". Art in America ( May-June 1971): 48-53.

Colacello Bob. Holy Terror. New York: Harper Perennial, 1990.

Crone Rainer. "Form and Ideology: Warhol's Techniques from Blotted Line to Film" in The Work, of Andy Warhol. Ed. Gary Garrels. Seattle: Bay Press, 1989, 70-92.

Dick Vivienne. "Warhol: Won't Wrinkle Ever" in Andy Warhol: Film Factory. Ed. Michael O'Pray. London: British Film Institute 1989, 154-159.

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Critical Response to Andy Warhol
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Notes xxv
  • CHRONOLOGY xxix
  • 1 - The Nineteen Sixties 1
  • 2 - The Nineteen Seventies 59
  • Notes 60
  • Notes 73
  • 3 The Nineteen Eighties 123
  • Notes 132
  • Notes 158
  • Notes 186
  • 4 - The Nineteen Nineties 239
  • Notes 247
  • Works Cited 248
  • Notes 259
  • Notes 265
  • Works Cited 267
  • Note 274
  • Works Cited 274
  • Notes 286
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 291
  • Index 297
  • About the Editor *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.