Gender and Destiny: Women Writers and the Holocaust

By Marlene E. Heinemann | Go to book overview

the reason may have more to do with the conditioning outlined by Chodorow than with morality, the conceptual framework adopted by many memoirists. This ability has origins, if Chodorow is right, in the oppressive situation of compulsory primary parenting by women. The purpose of this analysis is not to promote the further exploitation by women as compulsory mothers, although at first glance this oppression seems to have survival benefits in extreme situations. It makes more sense to argue that Holocaust literature makes a strong case for men to be active fathers, not only because it would free women to be more autonomous, but also because primary parenting by men would most likely enable males to develop the same capacity for friendship and empathy that women now have in greater numbers. Not only because of the next Holocaust and women's liberation, but because of the intense value now attached to world peace, the way in which human beings relate to each other has become critical. If the greater relational capacities of women could be shared by men, the world would never be the same.


Notes
1.
Terrence Des Pres, The Survivor ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1976), p. 38.
2.
Estelle C. Jelinek, "Women's Autobiography and the Male Tradition," in Women's Autobiography: Essays in Criticism, ed. Jelinek ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980), p. 10.
3.
Marcus Billson and Sidonie Smith, "Lillian Hellman and the Strategy of 'Other,'" in Jelinek, Women's Autobiography, p. 163.
4.
Alexander Donat, The Holocaust Kingdom ( New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965), p. 237.
5.
Germaine Tillion, Ravensbrück ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1975), p. 230.
6.
Hermann Langbein, Menschen in Auschwitz ( Vienna: Europa Verlags-AG, 1972), p. 37; quoted from Benedikt Kautsky, Teufel und Verdammte: Erfahrungen und Erkenntnisse aus sieben Jahren in deutschen Konzentrationslagern ( Vienna: Wiener Volksbuchhandlung, 1961). (My translation.)
7.
Izaak Goldberg, M.D., The Miracles Versus Tyranny ( New York: Philosophical Library, 1978).

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender and Destiny: Women Writers and the Holocaust
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 152

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.