Franchise Law Firms and the Transformation of Personal Legal Services

By Jerry Van Hoy | Go to book overview

trained professionals. They don't expect to pay a substantial amount of money ($350) to have a secretary construct the document on a computer in fifteen minutes. No doubt this is another reason why branch office attorneys tend to stress the individuality and challenge of each client they sell services to, rather than the repetitive procedures used to process the legal forms.


NOTES
1.
This chapter is a revision of my article ( Van Hoy 1995), "Selling and Processing Law: Legal Work at Franchise Law Firms", in Law and Society Review, 29: 703-729.
2.
My sample of attorneys at both firms report that they spend most of their time consulting with clients for divorces, personal bankruptcy filings, wills and personal injury settlements. At Arthur & Nelson attorneys report spending 51 percent of their time on divorces, 17 percent on personal bankruptcy filings, 12 percent on personal injury intakes and 6 percent on wills. At Beck & Daniels the numbers are 30, 24, 5 and 19 percent, respectively.
3.
While the secretaries I observed did an excellent job of screening out inappropriate clients, they did sometimes make mistakes in the coding of client cases handled by their firms. For example, during my office visits at Arthur & Nelson a client who wanted advice about declaring bankruptcy was erroneously coded as wanting a divorce.
4.
Some scripts are imposed on attorneys. For example, both firms script attorney advice about the rights and responsibilities of clients seeking personal bankruptcy protection.
5.
Arthur & Nelson managing attorneys spend about 84 percent of their time working on family (54.5), personal bankruptcy (21.4) and plaintiff's personal injury (7.7) cases. Staff attorneys spend about 78 percent of their time on these case types as well (47.5, 14.2, 15.8, respectively). At Beck & Daniels, family law, personal bankruptcy and plaintiff's personal injury only account for about 57 percent (29.3, 22.2, 5.0, respectively) of managing attorney efforts and 61 percent (30.0, 26.4, 4.8, respectively) of staff attorney time. Wills, criminal cases and residential real estate closings account for another 32 percent of managing attorney and 37 percent of staff attorney efforts at Beck & Daniels. However, at Arthur & Nelson wills, criminal and residential real estate work account for only 16 percent of managing attorney and 16 percent of staff attorney time.

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Franchise Law Firms and the Transformation of Personal Legal Services
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1- The Rise of Franchise Law Firms 1
  • 2- The Organization of Mass Production Law 27
  • Notes 50
  • 3- Client Services: Selling and Processing Law 51
  • Notes 75
  • 4- Franchise Law Firms and Traditional Practice 77
  • Notes 85
  • 5- Lawyer Alienation 87
  • Notes 112
  • 6- Alienation and Unions 115
  • Notes 127
  • 7- Markets, Innovation and Prepackaged Law 129
  • Appendix: Data and Methods 139
  • Notes 142
  • References 143
  • Index 149
  • About the Author 156
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.