Communications and Cultural Analysis: A Religious View

By Michael Warren | Go to book overview

situation, it is people--citizens, human beings--who can choose either to let arms control fail, and thereby sanction an ever greater buildup of pressures along the fault line, or to begin immediately, at what may be the last possible moment, to dismantle the nuclear stockpiles and ban further technological development and testing, and thereby move to lessen the pressures on both sides of the fault line. The world needn't let itself be lulled into accepting a fatalistic metaphor that presents as triumph the salvaging of three babies from an unspeakable catastrophe and suggests that this is all it should hope for. 20

Skill in the analysis of metaphor involves seeing in whose interests a particular comparison is used, whether the comparison is apt, and why these two matters are brought together for comparison. This skill is one that can be developed and should be a basic conceptual tool in the time of the sign. I believe these matters can be explained to people to help them think more clearly about their own positions. I have seen young people learn to rename reality, adopting a new language to take them out of the language game of, say, the militarists in our own country who name weapons of destruction as peacekeepers. Also, if I am conscious of my own metaphors and am willing to talk about them as well as about the importance of proper naming, my students come to imitate my behavior. Model nonsexist language for students, and many will come to see the point and be more discriminating in their own speech.

Understanding the connections between the images through which we see and the images we see, and then working at interpreting both sets of images, promises to open up many angles of cultural analysis and a dynamic cultural agency.


NOTES
1.
Charles Davis, "Religion and the Sense of the Sacred," Catholic Theological Society of America Proceedings 31 ( 1976): 87-105, at 90.
2.
Though using domination-subordination as my example of a comprehensive metaphor here, I agree with Gibson Winter that at the deepest level, the most comprehensive metaphor of our time is the mechanistic metaphor, the metaphor of the machine. Actually, the domination-subordination metaphor is successful because it reinforces the metaphor of the machine. I found the first chapter of Winter's book of special help in understanding how comprehensive metaphors work. See Gibson Winter, Liberating Creation: Foundations of Religious Social Ethics ( New York: Crossroad, 1981).
3.
See George Orwell treatment of this transformation in his brief essay "Me Sporting Spirit," in his Selected Writings ( London: Heinemann, 1947), pp. 159-62.

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communications and Cultural Analysis: A Religious View
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Note xvi
  • Chapter 1 the Problem of Popular Culture 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 What is Culture? 23
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter 3 Cultural Reproduction Among the Young 43
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 4 Cultural Production as an Avenue to Cultural Analysis 59
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter 5 a Theory of Images in Cultural Systems 91
  • Notes 109
  • Chapter 6 Metaphoric Images as Signifiers 113
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 7: Hegemony and the Possibilities of Contestation 127
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 157
  • About the Author 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.