Transitions to Capitalism and Democracy in Russia and Central Europe: Achievements, Problems, Prospects

By M. Donald Hancock; John Logue | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

DAVID BARTLETT is a specialist on the political economy of Hungary and Central and Eastern Europe. Bartlett is the author of The Political Economy of Dual Transformations: Market Reforms and Democratization in Hungary ( 1997). He is currently serving as an economic consultant in the region.

DANIEL BELL is International Program Coordinator for the Ohio Employee Ownership Center at Kent State University and staffed the center's Moscow office in 1994 and 1995, Bell authored Bringing Your Employees into the Business: An Employee Ownership Handbook for Small Business ( 1988), which has appeared in Russian translation.

LUCJA SWIATKOWSKI CANNON is Adjunct Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. She has been an adviser on privatization policy in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union since 1989. Cannon has published numerous articles on this subject in books, journals, and newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times.

DAVID ELLERMAN is Economic Adviser to the Chief Economist of the World Bank, where he focuses on transition economies, labor issues, and institutional development in education and training. He is the author of some fifty articles and four books in the fields of economics, mathematics, and philosophy and law. Ellerman's most recent book is Intellectual Trespassing as a Way of Life: Essays in Philosophy, Economics, and Mathematics ( 1994).

M. DONALD HANCOCK is Professor of political science and Director of the Center for European Studies at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of books,

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